An updated School Magazine website will be available from Term 3, 2019. As a result, all teaching resources that are currently available on this site will only be available for subscribers.

Subscribe now to access a library of digital resources and teaching strategies developed specifically to complement the print magazine.

Learning Resources for each school magazine include strategies for up to four of the stories, poems, plays and articles within each issue. Teachers can utilise these texts and strategies from each magazine in the classroom. The Learning Resources are designed to connect your students to the text and to provide higher order thinking strategies as well as other literacy ideas.

The strategies for each text can be used as a whole lesson or as small group or individual work in your classrooms.

Downloadable PDFs

Learning Resources AND accompanying worksheets can also be downloaded in PDF format for your convenience:
Issue 1 | Issue 2 | Issue 3 | Issue 4 | Issue 5 | Issue 6 | Issue 7

Issue 1 - February 2019


Jack and the Pelican

story by Janeen Brian | illustrated by Greg Holfeld

Worksheet: Comprehension - Facts


Outcomes

EN3-7C Understand and apply knowledge of language forms and features
understand how authors often innovate on text structures and play with language features to achieve particular aesthetic, humorous and persuasive purposes and effects (ACELA1518)

EN3-5B Respond to and compose texts recognise the techniques used by writers to position a reader and influence their point of view

EN3-8D Engage personally with texts recognise that ideas in literary texts can be conveyed from different viewpoints, which can lead to different kinds of interpretations and responses (ACELT1610)

English Textual Concept ‘Perspective’

English Textual Concept ‘Point of View’.


Connecting to the text

Think about a time when you have seen a hurt animal. How was the animal hurt? Was this caused by something a person or organisation had done? How did you respond? Use these questions as a class discussion and ask the students how they could represent this response.


Thought experiment

This is an activity where a scenario is provided that connects the listener and then asks a question for the students to respond to and discuss. The idea is that there is no single right answer as students should be able to use their argument skills to explain their reasoning.

Start this activity by creating an advantage and disadvantage table on the possible responses before you ask the question after the scenario.

Scenario - Ask students to close their eyes and visualise themselves in this scenario:

You are on holidays at the beach, walking along the sand looking at shells and seaweed that have washed up with the pounding waves. You smell the salt and seaweed and look out at the sea where you can see some rocks that have seaweed clinging to them. As you focus on the writhing seaweed, you see a small black-and-white penguin moving awkwardly. The penguin lifts its head and looks towards you. It starts to move, but with one of its wings kept away from his body. It slowly makes its way towards you, but not smoothly. It seems that for every move forward, it also moves sideways. You can hear its cries and feel the rain start. As it gets closer you can see an object in its wing.

Ask students to open their eyes and read the question on the board/screen. What is in the wing? How did it get there? What will happen to the penguin?

Put students into small groups and ask each group to discuss a resolution to this: is it our responsibility to look after wildlife? Propose a for and against argument—on a wiki or on paper.


Perspective

Present the two perspectives of the pelican in the story: Jack’s and Crocker’s. How does Jack feel about pelicans? How would a fisherman feel about pelicans?

Art activity: Students use an A3 sheet folded in half to represent the feelings of Jack on one side and the feelings of Crocker on the other.


Related text

Storm Boy by Colin Thiele is a story about a boy and a pelican. Watch the trailer for the 1976 film of the book and then compare this to the current trailer for the 2019 version. What points of view do both films use? [Teacher info: the 2019 film uses the boy’s perspective from his POV as an old man]. Do you think the author of ‘Jack and the Pelican’ used any ideas from Storm Boy?

Activity: Students write the story of ‘Jack and the Pelican’ from the point of view of the pelican.


Colloquialisms

Some of the colloquialisms used tend to be generational—e.g. ‘You’ll be too tall for those britches of yours!’ What other colloquialisms are used? Brainstorm a list using mind map software (such as bubbl us) with the class. Ask students to develop their own mind map of sayings or colloquialisms that they could use in their writing. For each entry they need to add a descriptive image.


Resources

Storm Boy by Colin Thiele
Storm Boy trailers of the 1976 and 2019 versions
Lesson plans for Storm Boy
Home by Jeannie Baker

Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Persephone, Queen of the Underworld

play by Sue Murray based on a Greek Myth | illustrated by Tohby Riddle

worksheet: Vocabulary - Changing language and expressions


Outcomes

EN3-1A Respond to and compose texts plan, rehearse and deliver presentations, selecting and sequencing appropriate content and multimodal elements for defined audiences and purposes, making appropriate choices for modality and emphasis (ACELY1700, ACELY1710)

EN3-7C Engage personally with texts recognise and explain creative language features in imaginative, informative and persuasive texts that contribute to engagement and meaning


Greek Myths

Introduce Greek myths to the students as stories told about the ancient Greek gods to help the ancient people understand their world. As the origins of the stories are shrouded in time, there are multiple versions of the stories. Select another version of the myth (listed in Resources) and read it or show it to the students. After a class reading of the play, discuss how the play has used specific techniques from drama to tell the story. What is different among the various versions?

Activity In groups, students select a different Greek myth and create a short script based on the myth. Scripts are shared and the teacher decides which group should perform which script. An extension to this could be including stage directions for the actors or background visuals to the scene, shown on an image projected onto the whiteboard.


Themes

Is this myth about good vs evil? Or is to about love conquering all? Who are the goodies in this play? Who are the baddies? Each student develops a one-slide presentation using PowerPoint, Keynote or Google Slides that shows what they think the main theme of the play is, without using any text.
Once these are finished, they can be presented for students to guess the theme.


Language affects the tone

In this play, the narrators provide the links and some humour in the presentation. Experiment with changing the language the narrators use. Can you make it more formal? Very Australian? Give it an evil tone? Try it as a class. How does this change the readers' responses to the play?

Groups of students can perform the play for the class based on different language forms and styles used by the narrators. The class could vote for the best play and award The Persephone Prize to the winner.


Resources

The Myth of Four Seasons
Demeter and her Daughter Persephone. Note: you will need Flash
The Reason for Seasons – Demeter & Persephone

Morning Camp

poem by Barbara Bufi | illustrated by Matt Ottley


Watch the Reading of the poem 'Morning Camp' on The School Magazine's YouTube channel.

Discuss how the language in this poem brings the bush to life. How does it do this? What do you think when you hear the words:

  • First dawn calls sound
  • Dry branches speak
  • Thirsty drought
  • Raucous feathered clouds
  • Squabbling rainbows

Use these words or phrases in a word cloud with an image behind each phrase representing the phrase. You may do this using any digital tool.

Issue 2 - March 2019


Finding George

story by Alys Jackson | illustrated by Jenny Tan

worksheet: Responding - Comparing similarities between a character and yourself


Connecting to the text EN3-8D/ACELT1610

After reading ‘Finding George’ ask students to put forward their thoughts, feelings and intuitions regarding the story. Students share immediate, instinctive thoughts on the story. Discuss using Think Pair Share or as a whole class.

OR

Text to Self—How do the ideas in this text relate to your own life, ideas, and experiences? Complete one or more of the following statements:

  • What I just read reminds me of the time when I …
  • I agree with/understand what I just read because in my own life …
  • I don’t agree with what I just read because in my own life …


Delving deeper EN3-8D/ACELT160

Have students use a KWL Chart to organise the information in the story. What do you know about the story? What would you like to know about the story? What do you need to know? What is The Big Issue?

What are the dangers and difficulties portrayed in Finding George? Which character pointed out the risks and dangers? Discuss the role of risks in our lives. Is it important to take risks in our lives? Define risk in relation to the story. What is a calculated risk? Are risks the same as chances?

Have the students construct a Venn diagram to compare their lives to George’s. Label as advantaged and disadvantaged or haves and have-nots. Find phrases used in the text that influence the reader’s point of view.


Get creative EN3-7C/ACELT1612/ACELT1618

Thinking creatively about the story, suggest changes and modifications:

Write another character into the story for a fun plot twist.

Adapt the story using animal characters instead of humans (anthropomorphism) using a narrative planner

Create a cartoon/storyboard using Storyboarder

Create a script, as a news reporter interviewing someone who works for The Big Issue. Use iMovie or Microsoft Movie Maker

Create a three-minute trailer persuading an audience to donate to your ‘new’ class charity or pay it forward by being kind. Here is an example from payitforwardday.com/


Connect to text EN3-2A

Using the scaffold in the poem Mermaids in Hiding (page 9), write about the plight of the homeless in Australia. Resources for students can be found at The Big Issue for students

Support: Students can follow the structure of a diamante poem.

Extension: Use rhyme, rap or prose


In the news EN3-1A/ACELY1700/ACElY1710

Present a three-minute news report on homelessness in Australia. Use information from The Big Issue for students site to support your news story.


Thinking outside the square EN3-8D

In groups, brainstorm ways to help the homeless or disadvantaged. As a class, discuss these ideas and come up with one ‘real’ solutions to help disadvantaged groups in Australia. Encourage the school SRC to get involved. What is the meaning of charity? If charity begins at home, where does it end? With you!


Further reading

Homelessness as a real Australian Issue The Big Issue

Pay it forward day 28.04.2019

Pay it forward card

Don't Play Games With the Mayas!

article by Lauri Kubuitsile

worksheet: Comprehension - Predicting content


Connecting to the text EN3-8D/ACELT1610

How do the ideas in this text relate to the larger world—past, present and future?

Students complete the following statements using Think Pair Share OR Making Connections PDF

  • What I just read makes me think about (event from the past) because …
  • What I just read makes me think about (event from today related to my own community, nation or world) because …
  • What I just read makes me wonder about the future because …

Discuss how sport ‘connects’ Australians, by bringing diverse (Touchdown word of the month) cultures together and apart.


Answer this EN3-3A

Quiz students using ready-made Kahoot. Search title ‘Don’t Play Ball with the Mayas!’

Encourage students to create their own quiz questions using the text.


Creating texts EN3-2A/ACELY1704/ACELY1714

Create an infographic using Canva to persuade people to play Pok-A-Tok. Have students organise their arguments using persuasion scaffold to support their thinking. Adapting structure and styles of texts draws on the intertextuality concept, where texts can be appropriated for audience, purpose, mode or media.

Adapt 'Don’t Play Ball with the Mayas!' from an informative text to a narrative text. You can choose to write from the point of view of a player, the ball or a spectator. For example, ‘The day I lost my head’ or ‘Heads-up has a whole new meaning!’


Changing it up EN3-6B

Adapt the features and structure of this text to create an informative text about another sport. Use ‘Don’t Play Ball with the Mayas!’ as a scaffold for student writing—using sub-headings, accurate information and interesting facts.

Extension: Research Mayas


Get creative EN3-2A/ACELY1707/ACELY1717

Create a six-word memoir about the death of an honourable friend and Pok-A-Tok player using Google Slides.

Create a three-minute podcast as a sports commentator watching Pok-A-Tok, using How to create a podcast.


Resources

Create a Kahoot

Play a game of Kahoot

Creating Found Poems

Mayan Civilisation.

Issue 3 - April 2019


Children of Yesterday

story by John O’Brien | illustrated by Craig Phillips

worksheet: Grammar - Adding adjectives to improve a text


Connecting to the text EN3-8D

Background reading: Strategy explained: text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world

  • Text-to-text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.
  • Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.
  • Text-to-world connections occur when we relate the text with what we already know about the world.

Text-to-self: Have a class discussion on how the ideas in this text relate to their own lives, ideas and experiences? Ask students to consider:

  • What does this text remind you of?
  • Can you relate to the characters in the text?
  • Does anything in this text remind you of anything in your own life?
  • I understand what I just read because in my own life …
  • I don’t agree with what I just read because in my own life …

Students complete a connection stem or making connections activity.

Discuss as a class or use one of these Think Pair Share worksheets.


Get creative EN3-7C

Create a script, for a news reporter interviewing a time traveller. Record the interview, using iMovie or Microsoft Movie Maker.

Create an advertisement to encourage time travellers to visit the year 2019.

Design a time machine using the SCAMPER technique.

Create a three-minute speech about cosmology or Stephen Hawking.

Create a diamante poem, using this Diamante Poem worksheet. Use Tomorrow to Yesterday, Now and Then, Past and Present as antonyms.

Write a different ending to the story or write the next chapter.

Write a summary of the story, using one of these summary worksheets.

Adapt the story ‘Children of Yesterday’ into a script for a play and create a podcast of the play using Audacity.


That’s interesting EN3-7B

Complete a PMI chart Encourage students to use their PMI chart to highlight three elements (in three different colours or use coloured post-it notes) within the narrative that are positive, negative and interesting:

  1. Plus/Positive: Good/Positive experiences, themes, messages, events and happenings in the text.
  2. Minus/Negative: Events in the text that are negative/bad experiences in the text, things that go wrong etc.
  3. Interesting: Anything that appeals to the student; questions, feelings and emotions that arise, morals, messages and connections that resonate with the students.

Author letter EN3-7B

Write a letter to author John O’Brien, using the writing a letter to the author guidelines and worksheets and the Praise Question Polish scaffold. Encourage students to highlight three elements within the narrative that they would Praise, Question and Polish:

  • Praise: What I like about the author’s writing style or ideas.
  • Questions: For the author to remove any confusion.
  • Polish: Things to improve, I would change, I wish that …, I wonder if …, I couldn’t believe …

Support: Write a postcard


Finding evidence EN3-8D

Connect to text using the structure of the poem ‘It Is What It Is’ as a scaffold to write about a ‘river of time’ as described in the story.

Step Inside visible thinking routine using PowerPoint or Google slide to illustrate understanding of narrative textual features, characters, feelings and beliefs.

Google Slide Knowledge Chart to organise information about cosmology. What do you know about Cosmology? What would you like to know? What do you need to know?

Compare Jacques, from part one of the story (Orbit 1, February 2019), and Charlotte, from part two of the story, using this Venn diagram worksheet.

Write a narrative titled ‘One Day’, based on the line from the story: ‘Some people are just so nice that one day with them is enough.’ (page 8). If one day was enough to spend with someone: Who would you spend it with? What would you do? Where would you go?

Support: Simplified KWFL table.


Hot Seat EN3-2A

Perform a Hot Seating activity where students can explore the point of view (sometimes written as POV) of each character. Perform in groups of three—Matthew (Dad/narrator), Charlotte and Lisa—or as a class. Students can pose questions to each character.

Explore further the English Textual Concept ‘Point of View’.


Map it out EN3-5B

Story map the main events of ‘Children of Yesterday’, with one of these Story Map worksheets, or by using a Story Arc.

Create a character map or attribute web using one of these character map/attribute web worksheets.

Create a film strip of ‘Children of Yesterday’ using this Story Board worksheet.

Create a cartoon/storyboard using Storyboarder or animate the story using Comic Life app.


Reflecting EN3-9E

Conduct an I used to think ... But now I think … routine. This routine helps students to reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I Used to Think … Now I Think … worksheet.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

Creating Podcasts With Your Students

Visible Thinking Routines

My Mother is an Alien

story by Melinda Szymanik | illustrated by Peter Sheehan

worksheet: Comprehension - Facts


Connecting to the text EN3-8D

Background reading: Strategy explained: text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world

  • Text-to-text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.
  • Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.
  • Text-to-world connections occur when we relate the text with what we already know about the world.

Text-to-Text: How do the ideas in this text remind you of another text (story, book, movie, song, etc.)? Complete the following statements:

  • What I just read reminds me of (story/book/movie/song) because …
  • The ideas in this text are similar to the ideas in …  because …
  • The ideas in this text are different than the ideas in … because …

Students complete the statements using a Think, Pair, Share worksheet or one of these Making Connections worksheets.


Power of persuasion EN3-2A

Create a persuasive flow chart or infographic using Canva for the importance of finding aliens. Scaffold arguments using a Persuasion Map to organise thinking and slogan generation. Adapting structure and styles of texts draws on the intertextuality concept, where texts can be appropriated for audience, purpose, mode or media.


Get creative EN3-7C

Create a film strip of ‘My Mother is and Alien’ using this Story Board worksheet.

Adapt the film strip into a play or podcast using Audacity.

Create an infographic using Canva, encouraging aliens to visit Earth.

Create a new alien language and use it in an example. What will we say when we meet an alien?

Create an alien using the alien species generator and write a narrative or descriptive paragraph.

Conduct an interview or write an article about people who claim to have seen real aliens.

Write about your feelings in relation to aliens using the title ‘Why I want to meet/don’t want to meet an alien’. Do you think they would like humans? Why/why not?


That’s interesting EN3-7B

Write a letter to author Melinda Szymanik Scott, using the writing a letter to the author guidelines and worksheets and the Praise Question Polish scaffold. Encourage students to highlight three elements within the narrative that they would Praise, Question and Polish:

  • Praise: What I like about the author’s writing style or ideas.
  • Questions: For the author to remove any confusion.
  • Polish: Things to improve, I would change, I wish that …, I wonder if …, I couldn’t believe …

Support: Write a postcard

Complete a PMI chart Encourage students to use their PMI chart to highlight three elements (in three different colours or use coloured post-it notes) within the narrative that are positive, negative and interesting:

  1. Plus/Positive: Good/Positive experiences, themes, messages, events and happenings in the text.
  2. Minus/Negative: Events in the text that are negative/bad experiences in the text, things that go wrong etc.
  3. Interesting: Anything that appeals to the student; questions, feelings and emotions that arise, morals, messages and connections that resonate with the students.

Map it out EN3-5B

Story map the main events of ‘My Mother Is an Alien’, with one of these Story Map worksheets, or by using a Story Arc.

Adapt the story map into a script for a play and perform as a mime.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

How to Create a 3D-Printed Alien

Treasure Box Tin

story by Annmarie Scott | illustrated by Anna Bron

worksheet: Comprehension - Thick and Thin questions


Connecting to the text  EN3-8D

Background reading: Strategy explained: text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world

  • Text-to-text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.
  • Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.
  • Text-to-world connections occur when we relate the text with what we already know about the world.

Text-to-self: Have a class discussion on how do the ideas in this text relate to their own lives, ideas and experiences? Ask students to consider:

  • What does this text remind you of?
  • Can you relate to the characters in the text?
  • Does anything in this text remind you of anything in your own life?
  • I understand what I just read because in my own life …
  • I don’t agree with what I just read because in my own life …

Students complete this double entry journal worksheet or connections document to record connections during the reading.

Discuss as a class or use a worksheet from Think, Pair, Share.


Create EN3-7C

Adapt the story using animal characters (war pigeons, service horses, Simpson’s donkey) instead of humans (anthropomorphism) using a narrative planner .

Create a script, for a news reporter interviewing a war veteran or war widow. Use iMovie or Microsoft Movie Maker.

Create an advertisement to encourage tourists to visit the Australian War Memorial

Design an ‘Operation Ration’ for a modern Australian soldier that would fit into a small tin, as described in the text, page 18: ‘… about the size of a set of playing cards …’

Use the SCAMPER technique to come up with a new advertisement to join the Australian Army. Students could refer to an example from the army’s ‘This is Us’ recruitment campaign.

Create a three-minute speech persuading an audience to donate to Legacy.


Author letter EN3-7B

Write a letter to the author Annmarie Scott using the Praise Question Polish scaffold. Encourage students to highlight three elements within the narrative that they would Praise, Question and Polish:

  1. Praise: What I like about the author’s writing style or ideas.
  2. Questions: For the author to remove any confusion.
  3. Polish: Things to improve, I would change, I wish that…, I wonder if…, I couldn’t believe…

Support: Write a postcard


Finding evidence EN3-8D

Conduct a Here Now / There Then Routine to consider present attitudes and judgments. This thinking routine encourages students to consider past perspectives and develop a better understanding of how thinking changes over time and across cultures.

Connect to text using the scaffold in the poem ‘Forgotten’ (page 17), to write about the plight of returned servicemen and women, Anzac Day or war.

Step Inside visible thinking routine using PowerPoint or Google slide to illustrate understanding of narrative textual features, characters, feelings and beliefs.

Write a biography poem titled ‘Lest We Forget’.

Write a biography of an Australian war veteran or war widow, using one of the biography worksheets.

Google Slide Knowledge Chart to organise information about Anzac Day. What do you know about Anzac Day? What would you like to know? What do you need to know?

Present a two minute news report on Anzac Day in Australia. Use this Anzac Day Commemoration Committee news clip to support your news story.

Support: Write a diamante poem and simplified KWFL.

Extension: Use rhyme, rap or prose.


Wonderful words EN3-6B

Research and create a crossword about Anzac Day, using this free crossword maker or crossword puzzle creator using unfamiliar words from the article, or these Anzac Day resources.. Use the crossword on page 34 of Touchdown as a guide for suitable questions.

Support: Question Creation Chart.

Extension: Create a Kahoot.


Applying EN3-2A

Adapt the story ‘Treasure Box Tin’ into a script for a play and perform as a podcast.

Write a different ending to the story or continue the story.

Perform a Hot Seating activity where students can explore the point of view (sometimes written as POV) of each character. Perform in groups of three (Grandpa Jim, Mum and Gran), or as a class. Students can pose questions to each character.

Explore further the English Textual Concept ‘Point of View’.


Understanding EN3-1A

Create a True/False quiz from the text, using this True False Quiz Sheet worksheet.

Write a summary of the story using one of these sample summary worksheets.

Identify a personal treasure and write a paragraph to describe it, or create a topic talk about the treasure.

Support: Question Creation Chart.

Extension: Students compose question cards for the class


Map it out EN3-2A

Story map the main events of ‘Treasure Box Tin’, with one of these Story Map worksheets, or by using a Story Arc.

Create a character map or attribute web.

Create a cartoon/storyboard using Storyboarder, or animate the story using Comic Life app, or draw a simple film strip.


Reflecting EN3-9E

Conduct an I used to think ... But now I think … routine. This routine helps students to reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I Used to Think … Now I Think … worksheet.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

‘The Treasure Box’ by Margaret Wild and Freya Blackwood

Resources

Debating and Public Speaking Resource

Harvard Thinking Routines

Anzac Day: What does it mean to you today?

Anzac Day Commemoration Committee website

Australian Department of Defence—Army: Anzac Day

The Australian War Memorial: D-Day, the Australian Story

Feathered Heroes

article by Beverly McWilliams

worksheet: Comprehension - Summarising a text


Connecting to the text EN3-8D

Background reading: Strategy explained: text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world

  • Text-to-text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.
  • Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.
  • Text-to-world connections occur when we relate the text with what we already know about the world.

Text-to-World: How do the ideas in this text relate to the larger world—past, present and future.

  • What I just read makes me think about (event from the past) because …
  • What I just read makes me think about (event from today related to my own community, nation or world) because …
  • What I just read makes me wonder about the future because …

Students complete this double entry journal worksheet or connections document to record connections during the reading.

Discuss as a class or use one of these Think Pair Share worksheets.


Create EN3-7C

Create a script, for a news reporter interviewing the heroic pigeons and their trainers. Mary Exeter, Royal Blue, Winkie, White Vision and Blue Boy were all honoured with The Dickin Medal, along with twenty-seven other pigeons. Use iMovie or Microsoft Movie Maker.

Write about your feelings in relation to how animals were used in the war, after watching this Behind the News: War Animals report.

Design a modern medal that commemorates war animals for their bravery.

Use the SCAMPER technique to design a new communication system based on the heroic pigeons.


Author purpose  EN3-7B

Watch Finding Author’s Purpose YouTube clip, which explains the ‘PIE’ model: was it to Persuade, Inform or Entertain? Discuss what Beverly McWilliams’s intention/purpose is?

Identify evidence in the text using the Author’s Purpose worksheet to support student thinking and analysis of the text.

Discuss the English Textual Concept ‘Style, which refers to the characteristic ways that composers choose to express ideas in a variety of modes.

How has Beverly McWilliams used semantics, structure, form, design and point of view to influence the audience? What language choices and images have been chosen and how do they impact our interpretation?


Finding evidence EN3-8D

Conduct a Here Now / There Then Routine to consider present attitudes and judgments. This thinking routine encourages students to consider past perspectives and develop a better understanding of how thinking changes over time and across cultures.

Google Slide Knowledge Chart to organise information about Anzac Day. What do you know about Anzac Day? What would you like to know? What do you need to know?

Support: Simplified KWFL


Applying EN3-2A

Write a diary entry from a soldier at war to his parents or friends back home in Australia. Find a collection of one soldier’s letters home to his parents at A Soldier’s Letters Home. Note the formal language, how writing styles have changed since the 1940s and the insights historical letters give us to the past.

Explore further the English Textual Concept ‘Point of View’.


Understanding EN3-1A

Create a True/False quiz from the text.

Create a cartoon/storyboard using Storyboarder or animate the story using Comic Life app or draw a simple film strip.

Support: Question Creation Chart

Extension: Students compose question cards for the class


Map it out EN3-5B

Story map the main events of ‘Feathered Heroes’, with one of these Story Map worksheets, or by using a Story Arc.

Create a character map or attribute web.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

Anzac Day Commemoration Committee website

Anzac Day: What does it mean to you today?

Australian War Memorial

Thinking Routines

Issue 4 - May 2019


The Cupboard

story by Mark Konik | illustrated by Anna Bron

worksheet: Thinking imaginatively - Showing emotion through writing


Understanding EN3-3A

Story Arc the main events in ‘The Cupboard’, to highlight the conventions of a narrative used by the author, Mark Konik. To find out how to use a story arc, read Using a Story Arc or watch this Introduction to the Story Arc YouTube clip . How does Mark Konik create suspense? (waiting in the cupboard). What role do sympathy and empathy play in the story, to carry the plot? How did the author engage them in the story? Explore further the English Textual Concept Narrative.

Create a True/False quiz from information found in the text, using this True False Quiz worksheet. Students can generate many questions from the text to demonstrate their understanding.

Support: Question Creation Chart.

Extension: Students create a Kahoot.


Engaging personally EN3-5B & EN3-8D

Cause and Effect Chain allows students to take notes on text structure/ language features/ visual features/context etc. to highlight how a text works: How did Mark Konik build a character? Where/what is the story line? Deconstructing written texts allows students to develop better writing skills, by identifying key elements or conventions, helping to deepen student understandings about how texts work.

Write a suspenseful narrative using a similar plot to the one in ‘The Cupboard’. Use Narrative Planners to help scaffold writing. Option to publish using Storybird or Book Creator.

Remind students that in order to engage their audience, they need to consider character identification (siblings), situations (family life) and themes (death of pets) to warrant reader interest and build a decent plot. Choosing which ideas will connect with their audience and their language choice, directly influences student writing development.

Point of view: Write a diary entry from the older or younger brother’s point of view. Encourage students to use the tragedy in the story, and the feelings portrayed, to enhance their writing endeavours. Explore further the English Textual Concept Point of View.


Connecting EN3-8D

Background reading: Strategy explained: text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world

  • Text-to-text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.
  • Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.
  • Text-to-world connections occur when we relate the text with what we already know about the world.

Text-to-self: Have a class discussion on how do the ideas in this text relate to their own lives, ideas and experiences? Ask students to consider:

  • What I just read reminds me of the time when I …
  • I agree with/understand what I just read because in my own life …
  • I don’t agree with what I just read because in my own life …

Students complete this double entry journal worksheet to record connections during the reading.

Discuss as a class.


Engaging critically        EN3-7B

Think, Pair, Share routine encourages students to think about something, such as a problem, question or topic, and then articulate their thoughts. The Think Pair Share routine promotes understanding through active reasoning and explanation. As students are listening to and sharing ideas, Think Pair Share encourages students to understand multiple perspectives.

  • What is grief?
  • Why isn’t the younger brother affected by the death of the family pets? Is this realistic?
  • What would you do to cheer someone up?

Suggest a different ending. Record student responses on a Think, Pair, Share worksheet.

Create an infographic, using Canva, on how to look after a pet of your choice.

Create an advertisement for a new healthy pet food.

Write a persuasive speech to convince your school principal to buy pets for your school. Scaffold arguments using this Persuasion Map worksheet as a scaffold to organise thinking.

Write a persuasive letter to convince your parents to buy you another pet, since all you other pets have recently died. Scaffold arguments the Persuasion Map worksheet to organise thinking.


Experimenting EN3-7C

Create a tombstone with a suitable funny epitaph for Mr Fluffy the guinea pig or Goldy the goldfish RIP. Refer to How to Write a Funny Epitaph Poem. Students might like to use an image from these numerous printable drawn tombstones.

Animate ‘The Cupboard’ using Comic Life or draw a simple film strip using this story board worksheet.

Write an ode to Mr Fluffy or Goldy. This two-page Writing an Ode worksheet has been designed to introduce students to the purpose, structure and language features of odes. It also includes a writing scaffold for students to use independently.


Reflecting EN3-9E

Character: Create a character map or attribute web about the type of character students think the older or younger brother has been portrayed as in the story, using one of these Character Map and Attribute Web worksheets. Explore how the author constructed the narrative in such a way, to invite and emotional response, to invoke empathy (or antipathy), sympathy and identification. Explore further the English Textual Concept Character.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

Harvard Thinking Routines

Think From the Middle: Strategy Toolbox

The Fishing Trip

story by Terry Lavelle | illustrated by Douglas Holgate

worksheet: Writing - Adapting text into a graphic story


Understanding EN3-3A

Conduct a Visible Thinking Questions Starts routine to generate creative questions about what the story could be about. Brainstorm a list of at least twelve questions about the story. Use these ‘question starts’ to help students think of questions they would like to know the answers to:

  • Why ...?
  • How would it be different if ...?
  • What are the reasons ...?
  • Suppose that ...?
  • What if ...?
  • What if we knew ...?
  • What is the purpose of ...?
  • What would change if ...?

Review the brainstormed list and highlight the questions that seem most interesting. Then, select one or more of the highlighted questions to discuss. Students can use this Thinking Routines Question Starts worksheet.

Story map the main events of ‘The Fishing Trip’, with one of these Story Map worksheets, to highlight either the conventions of a narrative or the stylistic devices used by the author. Depending on the conceptual lens chosen (narrative, character, genre or style) the story map takes on a varied purpose. For more information about the concepts refer to the English Textual Concepts.


Engaging personally EN3-5B & EN3-8D

Step inside is a visible thinking routine designed to get inside viewpoints. Three core questions guide students in this routine:

  1. What can the person or thing perceive?
  2. What might the person or thing know about or believe?
  3. What might the person or thing care about?

Brainstorm perceptions from the story and use themes and ideas generated by the class as story titles, for students to create their own narratives. Use this Step Inside Thinking Routine worksheet to record responses.

Write a brief recount about a time students have been ‘interrogated’ for information by their friends or family, like the main character in ‘The Fishing Trip’. This could also be performed as a short funny skit.

Perform a Hot Seating activity where students can explore the point of view (sometimes written as POV) of each character. Perform in groups of three, or as a class. Students can pose questions to each character.

Explore further the English Textual Concept Point of View.


Connecting EN3-8D

Background reading: Strategy explained: text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world

  • Text-to-text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.
  • Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.
  • Text-to-world connections occur when we relate the text with what we already know about the world.

Text-to-Text: How do the ideas in this text remind you of another text (story, book, movie, song, etc.)? Complete the following statements:

  • What I just read reminds me of (story/book/movie/song) because …
  • The ideas in this text are similar to the ideas in …  because …
  • The ideas in this text are different than the ideas in … because …

Students can complete the statements using a Think, Pair, Share worksheet.


Engaging critically        EN3-7B

Complete a PMI chart. Encourage students to use their PMI chart to highlight three elements (in three different colours or use coloured post-it notes) within the narrative that are positive, negative and interesting:

  1. Plus/Positive: Good/Positive experiences, themes, messages, events and happenings in the text.
  2. Minus/Negative: Events in the text that are negative/bad experiences in the text, things that go wrong etc.
  3. Interesting: Anything that appeals to the student; questions, feelings and emotions that arise, morals, messages and connections that resonate with the students.

Intertextuality: Create a persuasive flow chart or infographic, using Canva, regarding the importance of finding aliens. Scaffold arguments using this Persuasion Map worksheet to organise thinking and slogan generation. Adapting structure and styles of texts draws on the intertextuality concept, where texts can be appropriated for audience, purpose, mode or media. Explore further the English Textual Concept Intertextuality

Cycle of events routine may help students to recognise the way texts build an image of a certain group of people, or event. Students can write what each section tells in one colour and then choose another colour to list techniques used and another colour to explain the impact. They could choose from this selection of Cycle of Events Graphic Organiser worksheets.


Experimenting EN3-2A & EN3-8C

Create a film strip of ‘The Fishing Trip’ using this story board worksheet. Adapt the film strip into a play or podcast using Audacity.

Create an alien using this online Alien Species Generator and write a brief narrative or descriptive paragraph.

Conduct an interview with local people who claim to have seen the ‘twin aliens’ as mentioned in ‘The Fishing Trip’.

Create an animation of the story using Vyond.


Reflecting EN3-9E

Conduct an I used to think ... But now I think … routine to help students reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions and beliefs. Record responses on this I Used to Think … Now I Think … worksheet.

Write a journal entry about feelings in relation to aliens, using the title ‘Are we really alone?’ Questions that might be asked include: If aliens exist, would they would like humans? Why/why not? Are aliens already living among us, as suggested in the story? Where? Who would know?


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

Harvard Thinking Routines

How to Create an Alien Using 3D Printing

Think From the Middle: Strategy Toolbox

Nora

story by Sue Walker | illustrated by Kim Gamble

worksheet: Comprehension - Exploring connotations


Understanding EN3-3A

Step inside is a visible thinking routine designed to get inside viewpoints. Three core questions guide students in this routine:

  1. What can the person or thing perceive?
  2. What might the person or thing know about or believe?
  3. What might the person or thing care about?

The story evokes feelings of kindness, friendship, ignorance/arrogance, self-perception, insight, judgement, to name a few. Brainstorm perceptions from the story and use them as story titles. Students can record their responses on this Step Inside Thinking Routine worksheet.

Perspective: provides a lens through which we see the world. The lens can clarify, distort, magnify or blur what we see. In this way perspective offers a dynamic basis for the relationship between the composer, text and the responder.

Story Arc the main events in ‘Nora’, highlighting Nora’s transformation as portrayed by Sue Walker. To find out how to use a story arc, read Using a Story Arc or watch this Introduction to the Story Arc YouTube clip. How does Sue Walker portray Nora? Is the ‘artist’ character ignorant or arrogant? How did Nora become luminous? Wasn’t she always Nora? How does the author engage students in the story? Explore further the English Textual Concept Perspective.


Engaging personally EN3-5B & EN3-8D

Write a diamante poem about Nora’s transformation from ‘Unattractive to Luminous’. Use the Diamante Poem worksheet to scaffold and prompt writing.

Research the meaning of student names. There are multiple meanings for every name. Students can find the meaning they like most and compare it to the meaning of Nora using this Venn diagram worksheet.

Write a personal summary of ‘Nora’ and her transformation from unattractive to luminous. Encourage students to use their own opinion (point of view) and allow for personal interpretations of the text. Choose from this selection of Summary worksheets.

Write a paragraph about a talent that you have, hidden or obvious, to share with the class. If students believe they do not possess a talent, ask them to imagine or create a talent they desire. Refer to the first paragraph of ‘Nora’ as a writing prompt: ‘We all have a talent. Mine is …’ Remind students to write using first person and try not to begin every sentence with ‘I’.


Connecting EN3-8D

Background reading: Strategy explained: text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world

  • Text-to-text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.
  • Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.
  • Text-to-world connections occur when we relate the text with what we already know about the world.

Text-to-self: Have a class discussion on how do the ideas in this text relate to their own lives, ideas and experiences? Ask students to consider:

  • What I just read reminds me of the time when I …
  • I agree with/understand what I just read because in my own life …
  • I don’t agree with what I just read because in my own life …

Students complete a Text to Self sheet to record connections. Discuss as a class.


Engaging critically        EN3-7B

Complete a PMI chart. Encourage students to use their PMI chart to highlight three elements (in three different colours or use coloured post-it notes) within the narrative that are positive, negative and interesting:

  1. Plus/Positive: Good/Positive experiences, themes, messages, events and happenings in the text.
  2. Minus/Negative: Events in the text that are negative/bad experiences in the text, things that go wrong etc.
  3. Interesting: Anything that appeals to the student; questions, feelings and emotions that arise, morals, messages and connections that resonate with the students.

Discuss: Paragraph three: ‘It was an unattractive name, but it suited Nora perfectly.’ How can an unattractive name ever be suitable? What is the author trying to say? Use the following thinking routine to get students to articulate their thoughts.

Think, Pair, Share routine involves posing a question to students, asking them to take a few minutes of thinking time and then turning to a nearby student to share their thoughts. This routine encourages students to think about something, such as a problem, question or topic, and then articulate their thoughts. The Think Pair Share routine promotes understanding through active reasoning and explanation because students are listening to and sharing ideas, Think Pair Share encourages students to understand multiple perspectives.


Experimenting EN3-7C

Point of View: Write a letter of complaint or praise, to the artist, from Nora’s mother’s point of view. Experimenting with point of view allows students to explore other ways of seeing and invites certain attitudes and responses to the text. Explore further the English Textual Concept Point of View.

Design an infographic, using Canva, to advertise your ‘talent’ school (Diana’s Dancing Disco), job or service. For example: A masseuse who knows how to ‘Knead the Knots’. Explore puns and have fun with words. As resources, you could refer to this collection of funny puns at jokesclean.com or this collection of funny puns at FunEnglishGames.com.

Create an animation of the story using Vyond.

Write a narrative ending with the final words: ‘With a smile that I’ll remember forever.’ Use this Narrative Ideas Pyramid worksheet to organise ideas and plan writing.


Reflecting EN3-9E

Journal: Ask students to write a journal entry about who they think goes unnoticed in their classroom. Have they got a Nora in their class? These people are often called wallflowers or shy, but how do we really know how they feel? How can we make people feel luminous?

Conduct an I used to think ... But now I think … routine to help students to reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I Used to Think … Now I Think … worksheet.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

Harvard Thinking Routines

Think From the Middle: Strategy Toolbox

Travelling from England to France the Hard Way

article by Julie Nickerson | illustrated by Marjorie Crosby-Fairall

worksheet: Research - Compiling research facts


Understanding EN3-3A

Conduct a See, Think, Wonder thinking routine, using the image of Brianna on page 5. This routine encourages students to make careful observations and thoughtful interpretations. It helps stimulate curiosity and sets the stage for inquiry. Use student See Think Wonder worksheet to record responses to such questions as.

  • What do you see?
  • What do you think about that?
  • What does it make you wonder?

Write a biography poem about Brianna Thompson, using this Write a Biography Poem worksheet, and the information in the article.

Support: Brainstorm words and ideas prior to writing and scaffold sheets/links above.

Extension: Use rhyme, rap or prose.


Engaging personally EN3-5B & EN3-8D

Point of view: Use the poem ‘Sailing Quilted Seas’, by Elizabeth Klein (page 11) as a scaffold to write about the plight of a Channel swimmer. ‘Sailing Quilted Seas’ is written from the point of view (POV) of a sailor and their journey across the sea. Appropriate the poem’s ideas and imagery, but change the POV to that of a swimmer attempting to cross the English Channel. Explore further the English Textual Concept Point of View.

Create a poem about a dream you may have. Imagine being like Brianna: ‘She dreams big and follows through’. A variety of poetic styles/resources can be accessed at On Butterfly Wings: Stage 2 Poetry Unit of Work.


Connecting EN3-8D

Background reading: Strategy explained: text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world

  • Text-to-text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.
  • Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.
  • Text-to-world connections occur when we relate the text with what we already know about the world.

Text-to-World: How do the ideas in this text relate to the larger world—past, present and future?

Students complete the following statements using Making Connections Text to World worksheet:

  • What I just read makes me think about (event from the past) because …
  • What I just read makes me think about (event from today related to my own community, nation or world) because …
  • What I just read makes me wonder about the future because …

Discuss as a class or use a Think, Pair, Share worksheet.


Engaging critically        EN3-7B

Watch Finding Author’s Purpose YouTube clip, which explains the ‘PIE’ model: was it to Persuade, Inform or Entertain? Discuss what Julie Nickerson’s intention/purpose is.

Identify evidence in the text using the Author’s Purpose worksheet to support student thinking and analysis of the text.

Discuss the English Textual Concept Style, which refers to the characteristic ways that composers choose to express ideas in a variety of modes.

How has Julie Nickerson used semantics, structure, form, design and point of view to influence the audience? What language choices and images have been chosen and how do they impact our interpretation?

Create a three-minute speech persuading an audience learn how to swim. Use this Persuasion Map worksheet to help students see the development of logical arguments in texts, build their own arguments or determine the merit of arguments. This map/scaffold could be used twice; once for content and once to list the techniques used at each stage to enhance the arguments.


Experimenting EN3-7C

Create a script, for a news reporter interviewing Brianna Thompson before she leaves, or upon her return. Option to film using iMovie or Microsoft Movie Maker

Create an advertisement to encourage people to swim the channel.

Write an ode to a famous Australian swimmer. Students could refer to this Writing an Ode worksheet. Another helpful resource is Famous Australian Swimmers: A History of Swimming in Australia.

Research other Australian swimmers who have crossed the English Channel. Refer to Channel Swimming Association: List of Successful Swims.

Write a narrative titled ‘The Hard Way’ or ‘Epic Journey’ using personal examples of triumph over adversity from students’ own lives. Brainstorm as a class to generate ideas. Use story writing helpers to organise student writing.

Write a biography of a different famous Australian swimmer, using one of these Biography worksheets. Students can again refer to Famous Australian Swimmers: A History of Swimming in Australia.


Reflecting EN3-9E

Conduct an I used to think ... But now I think … routine to help students to reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I Used to Think … Now I Think … worksheet.

Character: Create a character map or attribute web about the type of character you think Howard has been portrayed as in the story, using one of these Character Map and Attribute Web worksheets. Explore how the author constructed the article in such a way as to invite an emotional response to evoke empathy (or antipathy) and identification. Explore further the English Textual Concept Character.

View the ABC Education video clip: Creating Characters With Sally Rippin , where author Sally Rippin talks about the process of character development and the role of imagination.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

‘Poets in the making: confirming identity in English’ J Dutton and K Rushton, Scan Vol 37 2018

Resources

Harvard Thinking Routines

Think From the Middle: Strategy Toolbox

Issue 5 - June 2019

Chang and Eng

article by Sue Bursztynski

worksheet: Comprehension - Predicting content


Understanding EN3-3A

Create a timeline of Chang and Eng’s lives, using one of these Printable Timeline worksheets. Use evidence from the text, beginning in Siam in 1811 and ending in winter 1874.

Complete a Three Facts and a Fib thinking routine to ascertain student understanding. This thinking routine gives students the chance to develop their skills in narrowing choices.

Conduct a Here Now / There Then thinking routine to consider present attitudes and judgments. This thinking routine encourages students to consider past perspectives and develop a better understanding of how thinking changes over time and across cultures.

Story map the main events of the twins’ lives to highlight the multiple problems they faced and their remarkable tenacity and ingenuity to lead successful lives. Choose from one of these on Story Map worksheets.


Engaging personally EN3-5B & EN3-8D

Write a summary of ‘Chang and Eng: The Siamese Twins’, using one of these Summary worksheets, highlighting the main events and struggles they faced in their lives. Refer to the article for the use of subheadings and other structural elements to organise student writing.

Point of view: Write a diary entry from a twin’s point of view about their wedding day. Highlight the relevant facts in the text as a class and encourage students to use these textual elements to enhance their writing endeavours. Explore further the English Textual Concept ‘Point of View’.

Write a brief description about twins students know personally, or famous twins. Would they like to be a twin? Why/why not? What do they think being a twin would be like?

Extension: research the word, ‘doppelganger’, and find famous pairs online.


Connecting EN3-8D

Background reading: Strategy explained: text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world

Text-to-text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.

Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.

Text-to-world connections occur when we relate the text with what we already know about the world.

Text-to-World: How do the ideas in this text relate to the larger world—past, present and future.

  • What I just read makes me think about (event from the past) because …
  • What I just read makes me think about (event from today related to my own community, nation or world) because …
  • What I just read makes me wonder about the future because …

Discuss as a class or use a Think, Pair, Share worksheet.


Engaging critically       EN3-7B

Conduct a Question Starts Visible Thinking Routine to generate creative questions about the story Brainstorm a list of at least twelve questions about the story. Use these question-starts to help students think of interesting questions:

  • Why ...?
  • How would it be different if ...?
  • What are the reasons ...?
  • Suppose that ...?
  • What if ...?
  • What if we knew ...?
  • What is the purpose of ...?
  • What would change if ...?

Review the brainstormed list and highlight the questions that seem most interesting. Then, select one or more of the highlighted questions to discuss. Students could use this Question Starts Thinking Routine worksheet.

Write a letter to the story’s author, Sue Bursztynsk, using the writing a letter to the author guidelines and worksheets and the Narrative Praise Question Polish Peer-Review worksheet as a scaffold. Encourage students to highlight three elements within the narrative that they would Praise, Question and Polish:

Praise: What I like about the author’s writing style or ideas.

Questions: For the author to remove any confusion.

Polish: Things to improve, I would change, I wish that …, I wonder if …, I couldn’t believe …

Support: Write a postcard


Experimenting EN3-6B, EN3-8D & EN3-7C

Character: Create a character map or attribute web about the twins, using one of these Character Map and Attribute Web worksheets. Explore how the author constructed the article in such a way as to invite an emotional response in the reader, to evoke empathy (or antipathy) and to inspire. Explore further the English Textual Concept ‘Character’.

Research and create a crossword about Chang an Eng, using this free crossword maker or crossword puzzle creator and unfamiliar words from the article. Use the crossword on page 34 of Touchdown as a guide for suitable questions. Remember answers can only be letters or words, not numbers.

Support: Question Creation Chart.

Extension: Create a Kahoot.

Create a script for a news reporter interviewing the twins. Option to film using iMovie or Microsoft Movie Maker.

Write a biography poem about a twin from the article, using this Write a Biography Poem worksheet.

Journal: How inspiring were Chang and Eng? Why/why not?


Reflecting EN3-9E

Conduct an I used to think ... But now I think … routine. This routine helps students to reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I Used to Think … Now I Think … worksheet.

Exit Slips are a formative assessment that can be used to quickly check for understanding. The teacher poses one or two questions in the last couple minutes of class and asks student to fill out an ‘exit slip’ (e.g. on an index card) to ascertain student thinking and understanding. Here are Instructions on filling out an Exit Slip and two Exit Slip worksheets.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

Harvard Thinking Routines

Think From the Middle: Strategy Toolbox

Fish Out of Water

Terry Lavelle | illustrated by Anna Bron

worksheet: Writing - The Rule of Three


Understanding EN3-3A

Character: Complete a character organisation worksheet to illustrate how Terry Lavelle reveals clues to help students get to know Ariella. This Character Development worksheet helps students focus and analyse four ways in which an author develops characters: physical description of the character, character’s words and actions, what others say about the character, direct commentary by the narrator. Explore further the English Textual Concept ‘Character’.

Conduct a See, Think, Wonder thinking routine to explore the title and make predictions about ‘The Zorthan Episode’, using the image on page 4. This routine encourages students to make careful observations and thoughtful interpretations. It helps stimulate curiosity and sets the stage for inquiry. Use a student See Think Wonder worksheet to record responses.

  • What do you see?
  • What do you think about that?
  • What does it make you wonder?

Create a story arc to find and summarise the main events in ‘Fish Out of Water’, to highlight the conventions of a narrative used by the author, Terry Lavelle. For information on how to use a story arc, read Using a Story Arc or watch this Introduction to the Story Arc YouTube clip. How does Terry create empathy? What role do kindness and suspense play in the story to carry the plot? How does the author engage the audience? Explore further the English Textual Concept ‘Narrative’.


Engaging personally EN3-2A, EN3-5B & EN3-8D

Write a diary entry from Ariella’s point of view (“I hope he’s right about finding my place.”) Have students write what Ariella was thinking when she boarded the bus. What is it like not to fit it? Why is Mr Galene so kind? Imagine school without friends. Explore further the English Textual Concept ‘Point of View’.

Write a narrative using a similar plot to the one in ‘Fish Out of Water’ using a different fish metaphor. Option to publish using Storybird or Book Creator.

Remind children that in order to engage their audience, they need to consider character identification (students/friendship), situations (school excursions) and themes (fears/not belonging) to warrant reader interest and build a decent plot. Choosing which ideas will connect with their audience and their language choice, directly influences student writing development.


Connecting EN3-8D

Background reading: Strategy explained: text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world

  • Text-to-text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.
  • Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.
  • Text-to-world connections occur when we relate the text with what we already know about the world.

Text-to-Self: How do the ideas in this text relate to your own life, ideas, and experiences?

  • What I just read reminds me of the time when I…
  • I agree with/understand what I just read because in my own life…
  • I don’t agree with what I just read because in my own life…

Students complete a Text to Self Connections worksheet.

Discuss as a class.

Create a Wordle to outline the various traits or characteristics of a true friend. What kind of friend do students want? What kind of friend are they?


Engaging critically       EN3-7B

Intertextuality: Create a persuasive flow chart or infographic, using Canva, on the importance of protecting our oceans and sea life from pollution. Scaffold arguments using this Persuasion Map worksheet to organise thinking and slogan generation. Adapting structure and styles of texts draws on the intertextuality concept, where texts can be appropriated for audience, purpose, mode or media. Explore further the English Textual Concept ‘Narrative’.

Compare how Mer-People and Ter-People treat the ocean using this Venn diagram worksheet. Use evidence from the text to support students and illustrate how the author’s language choice influences the reader’s opinion, as well as character and plot development.

Research and present information about the ocean using resources such as Ocean Facts For Kids. Create a crossword puzzle, using this free crossword maker or crossword puzzle creator. Use the crossword on page 34 of Touchdown as a guide for suitable questions, for example: Q: What is the largest ocean? A: The Pacific Ocean. Remember answers can only be letters or words, not numbers.

Support: Question Creation Chart

Extension: Create a Kahoot.

Conduct a Think, Pair, Share routine to promote understanding through active reasoning and explanation. This Thinking Routine encourages students to think about something, such as a problem, question or topic, and then articulate their thoughts. As students are listening to and sharing ideas, Think Pair Share encourages students to understand multiple perspectives. Record student responses on one of these Think Pair Share worksheets.

  • What is kindness? Is kindness common or rare?
  • What is a random act of kindness?
  • List examples of when students have been kind?
  • Does kindness promote understanding?
  • How did Mr Galene know about Ariella’s element?

Experimenting EN3-6B, EN3-8D & EN3-7C

Create a found poem from ‘Fish Out of Water’ using interesting words from page 7. Refer to the Creating Found Poems YouTube clip.

Design an infographic using Canva to advertise friendship. Brainstorm skills of good friends to support student ideas.

Animate ‘Fish Out of Water’ using Comic Life or draw a simple film strip using this Story Board worksheet.

Write a diamante poem titled, ’Ariella’s Wish’. Brainstorm appropriate antonyms to generate student ideas. Refer to this useful Diamante Poem worksheet.

Write a persuasive letter to the school principal or the SRC for your class or school to take part in the Take 3 For the Sea program.


Reflecting EN3-9E

Conduct an I used to think ... But now I think … routine. This routine helps students to reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I Used to Think … Now I Think … worksheet.

Journal: Ask students to describe when they feel they are ‘in their element’. What does that mean? What is finding your true purpose about? Read/re-read the two paragraphs at the top of page 10 to ensure student understanding and clarify journal writing ideas.

Exit Slips are a formative assessment that can be used to quickly check for understanding. The teacher poses one or two questions in the last couple minutes of class and asks student to fill out an ‘exit slip’ (e.g. on an index card) to ascertain student thinking and understanding. Here are Instructions on filling out an Exit Slip and two Exit Slip worksheets.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

Harvard Thinking Routines

Think From the Middle: Strategy Toolbox

The Ghost that Growled

story by Kate Walker | illustrated by Stephen Axelsen

worksheet: Comprehension - Analysing dialogue


Understanding EN3-3A

Clarify and demonstrate understanding using the cube template. Supported by their peers, students practise articulating their views and deepen their understanding of the text or themes depending on teacher direction. Use ghosts as the stimulus for the cube.

Narrative: Story map the main events of ‘The Ghost that Growled’, with one of these Story Map worksheets, to highlight either the conventions of a narrative or the stylistic devices used by the author. Depending on the conceptual lens chosen (narrative, character, genre or style) the story map takes on a varied purpose. Explore further the English Textual Concept ‘Narrative’.

Adapt the narrative story map (above) into an ‘action’ script for a play to perform as a mime.


Engaging personally EN3-2A, EN3-5B & EN3-8D

Write a suspenseful narrative using a similar plot to the one in ‘The Ghost that Growled’. Use this Narrative Super Planner worksheet to help scaffold writing. Option to publish using Storybird or Book Creator.

Remind children that in order to engage their audience, they need to consider character identification (war children), situations (away from home) and themes (mysterious ghostly happenings) to warrant reader interest and build a decent plot. Choosing which ideas will connect with their audience and their language choice, directly influences student writing development.

Conduct a Step Inside visible thinking routine. This routine is designed to help students look at characters and events differently by exploring different viewpoints. Three core questions guide students in this routine:

  1. What can the person or thing perceive?
  2. What might the person or thing know about or believe?
  3. What might the person or thing care about?

Brainstorm perceptions from the story and use themes and ideas generated by the class as story titles, for their own narratives. Students record their responses on these Step Inside worksheets.

Survey the class about ‘The Ghost that Growled’ to explore appreciation, effectiveness of different features, modes, etc. Use it to reflect on choices, for organising their thoughts about their audience, or for finding out the effect of textual choices to help inform students’ ideas prior to their experimentation. Students can us this Survey worksheet.


Connecting EN3-8D

Background reading: Teaching Strategy explained: text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world

  • Text-to-text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.
  • Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.
  • Text-to-world connections occur when we relate the text with what we already know about the world.

Text-to-Text: How do the ideas in this text remind you of another text (story, book, movie, song, etc.)? Complete the following statements:

  • What I just read reminds me of (story/book/movie/song) because …
  • The ideas in this text are similar to the ideas in …  because …
  • The ideas in this text are different than the ideas in … because …

Students complete a Connection Stem worksheet.


Engaging critically EN3-7B

Complete a PMI chart. Encourage students to use their PMI chart to highlight three elements (in three different colours or use coloured post-it notes) within the narrative that are positive, negative and interesting:

  1. Plus/Positive: Good/Positive experiences, themes, messages, events and happenings in the text.
  2. Minus/Negative: Events in the text that are negative/bad experiences in the text, things that go wrong etc.
  3. Interesting: Anything that appeals to the student; questions, feelings and emotions that arise, morals, messages and connections that resonate with the students.

A graphic representation of the cycle of events may help students to recognise the way texts build an image of a certain group of people, or event. Choose from one of these Cycle of Events Graphic Organiser worksheets. Students can write what each section reveals in one colour and then choose another colour to list techniques used and another colour to explain the impact.


Experimenting EN3-2A & EN3-8C

Create a film strip of ‘The Ghost That Growled’, using this Story Board worksheet, and adapt it into a play. Option to record as a podcast using Audacity.

Intertextuality: Use the poem ‘Four Paces’ by Robert Sealey (page 18), as a scaffold to write a poem about ghosts. Appropriate the structure, imagery and some words of the poem. Explore further the English Textual Concept ‘Intertextuality

Write the next chapter using the final illustration as stimulus. Will Erik’s chocolate remain protected by the ghostly shadows in the picture frame?

Create an animation of the story using Vyond.


Reflecting EN3-9E

Conduct an I used to think ... But now I think … routine. This routine helps students to reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I Used to Think … Now I Think … worksheet.

Exit Slips are a formative assessment that can be used to quickly check for understanding. The teacher poses one or two questions in the last couple minutes of class and asks student to fill out an ‘exit slip’ (e.g. on an index card) to ascertain student thinking and understanding. Here are Instructions on filling out an Exit Slip and two Exit Slip worksheets.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

Harvard Thinking Routines

Think From the Middle: Strategy Toolbox

What a Hoot!

article by Anne Renaud

worksheet: Writing - Illustrating a story


Understanding EN3-3A

Google Slide Knowledge Chart to organise information about Bruit de Frigo. What do you know about them? What would you like to know? What do you need to know?

Support: Simplified KWFL worksheet.

Find three interesting words from the article ‘What a Hoot!’ For example: initiative, shingles, urbanists and collective. Students can also include the TSM word of the month: dovetail Research their meaning and use them to increase student vocabulary in this Vocabulary Graphic Organiser worksheet.

Create a True/False quiz from information found in the text, using this True False Quiz Sheet worksheet. Students can generate many questions from the text to demonstrate their understanding.

Support: Question Creation Chart

Extension: Create a Kahoot.


Engaging personally EN3-2A, EN3-5B & EN3-8D

Point of View: Write a descriptive narrative from the point of view of the owl-shaped cabin. Experimenting with point of view allows students to explore other ways of seeing. Option to publish using Storybird or Book Creator. Explore further the English Textual Concept ‘Point of View’.

Write a descriptive ‘review’ about spending a night in the owl structures. Brainstorm ideas to support student writing. Use the vivid descriptions in the article to imagine what it would feel like to stay inside the ‘owl’. Use sensory cues, the lack of amenities and ‘roughing it’ as well as the beauty of nature and seeing the moon and stars from your bed.


Connecting EN3-8D

Background reading: Teaching Strategy explained: text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world

  • Text-to-text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.
  • Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.
  • Text-to-world connections occur when we relate the text with what we already know about the world.

Text-to-Text: How do the ideas in this text remind you of another text (story, book, movie, song, etc.)? Complete the following statements:

  • What I just read reminds me of (story/book/movie/song) because …
  • The ideas in this text are similar to the ideas in …  because …
  • The ideas in this text are different than the ideas in … because …

Discuss as a class or use a Think, Pair, Share worksheet.


Engaging critically EN3-7B

Research and write an informative article about the other structures around Bordeaux. Use ‘What a Hoot’ as a model/scaffold to support student writing. Locate more information and images online at Periurban Refuges: Art to live in.

Write a persuasive letter to convince parents to holiday in Bordeaux, in a cabin of the student’s choice. Scaffold arguments using this Persuasion Map worksheet to organise thinking.  Locate information online at Periurban Refuges: Art to live in.

Use the SCAMPER technique to design a new cabin based on the various cabins in Bordeaux.

Watch Finding Author’s Purpose YouTube clip, which explains the ‘PIE’ model: was it to Persuade, Inform or Entertain? Discuss what Anne Renaud’s intention/purpose is. Identify evidence in the text using the Author’s Purpose worksheet to support student thinking and analysis of the text.


Experimenting EN3-6B, EN3-8D & EN3-7C

Create an advertisement or design a brochure to encourage tourists to visit one of the cabins in Bordeaux.

Research other ‘eaux’ words—their etymology and their meanings.

Design a new cabin structure for an Australian location. Draw, label, map and write a brief description of the cabin. Utilise unique Australian animals and Aboriginal names for structures. Brainstorm ideas to support and encourage student imagination and creativity.

Write a catchy slogan to advertise the student-designed cabin.


Reflecting EN3-9E

Conduct an I used to think ... But now I think … routine. This routine helps students to reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I Used to Think … Now I Think … worksheet.

Exit Slips are a formative assessment that can be used to quickly check for understanding. The teacher poses one or two questions in the last couple minutes of class and asks student to fill out an ‘exit slip’ (e.g. on an index card) to ascertain student thinking and understanding. Here are Instructions on filling out an Exit Slip and two Exit Slip worksheets.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

Harvard Thinking Routines

Think From the Middle: Strategy Toolbox

Issue 6 - July 2019

Dance of the Lascaux Pony

story by Sheryl Gwyther | illustrated by Anna Bron

worksheet: Grammar - Exploring commas


Understanding EN3-3A

Conduct a Step Inside Visible Thinking Routine. This routine is designed to help students look at characters and events differently by exploring different viewpoints. Three core questions guide students in this routine:

  • What can the person or thing perceive?
  • What might the person or thing know about or believe?
  • What might the person or thing care about?

The story evokes feelings of fear, reverence, insight, judgement, and courage to name a few. Brainstorm perceptions from the story. Option to use as story titles. Students could record their responses on one of these Step Inside worksheets.

Find three interesting words from the story. Research their meaning and use them to increase student vocabulary in this Interesting Words Graphic Organiser worksheet. For example, aurochs, averted, grotto, ochres and sinew. The Touchdown word of the month, ‘oblivious’, could also be included.


Engaging personally EN3-5B & EN3-8D

Complete this Sensory Chart Graphic Organiser worksheet, to respond to the text, using imagery and descriptive language directly from the text. For example, what did Rouan see? ‘How Lascaux danced, and pranced, how she bore him across the grassland.’ Students could also illustrate/transform their most appealing textual imagery into visual images or artworks.

Write a personal retelling or summary of the events in the story using this Retell Summary worksheet. Add a personal comment about whether Rouan’s transformation into the ‘Mark-maker’ was predictable and/or interesting. Did Rouan call up the spirits of animals to help him? Encourage students to use their own opinion or point of view to allow for personal interpretations of the text.

Connecting EN3-8D

Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.

Text-to-Self: Have a class discussion on how do the ideas in this text relate to students’ own lives, ideas and experiences. Ask students to consider:

  • What I just read reminds me of the time when I …
  • I agree with/understand what I just read because in my own life …
  • I don’t agree with what I just read because in my own life …

Students complete a Text-to-Self Connections worksheet and discuss as a class.

Teaching Strategy explained: Text-to-Text, Text-to-Self, Text-to-World Rationale.


Engaging critically EN3-7B

Discuss the sentence, ‘I saw them. I felt their bodies. I smelled and heard them … in my head and in my heart.’ What is Sheryl Gwyther telling us about Rouan? How has she made the reader feel about Roaun (empathy, sympathy, fear, etc.)? What role did the elder play in the story? How do we know what happens next? What is the message within the story? Use the following Think, Pair, Share Visible Thinking Routine to assist students to articulate their thoughts. Students could use one of these Think, Pair, Share worksheets.

The routine involves posing questions (above) to students, asking them to take a few minutes of thinking time and then turning to a nearby student to share their thoughts. This routine encourages students to think about something, such as a problem, question or topic, and then articulate their thoughts. The Think Pair Share routine promotes understanding through active reasoning and explanation because students are listening to and sharing ideas, Think Pair Share encourages students to understand multiple perspectives.

Write a letter to author Sheryl Gwyther using the Writing a Letter to an Author guidelines and worksheets and the Narrative Praise Question Polish Peer-Review worksheet as a scaffold. Encourage students to highlight three elements within the narrative that they would Praise, Question and Polish:

  1. Praise: What I like about the author’s writing style or ideas.
  2. Questions: For the author to remove any confusion.
  3. Polish: Things to improve, I would change, I wish that …, I wonder if …, I couldn’t believe …

Support: Write a postcard


Experimenting EN3-7C

Write a diary entry for George, Simon, Jacques or Marcel, about the day they made their amazing secret discovery. Read the article on page 24 of Touchdown 6 2019, ‘Treasure Underground’, for more detailed information about these brave (no longer) young men.

Design a poster/advertisement to encourage tourists to visit ‘Lascaux II’, see ‘Treasure Underground’, Touchdown 6 (page 24), for detailed information about this famous discovery.

Create an animation of ‘Dance of the Lascaux Pony’ using Vyond.

Write a narrative beginning with any sentence directly from the text. For example, ‘This is the place.’ The elder pointed his hand at a bare space of rock.

Complete this Narrative Idea Pyramid worksheet to organise ideas and plan writing.


Reflecting EN3-9E

Conduct an I used to think ... But now I think … routine. This routine helps students to reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I Used to Think … Now I Think … worksheet.

Exit Slips are a formative assessment that can be used to quickly check for understanding. The teacher poses one or two questions in the last couple minutes of class and asks student to fill out an ‘exit slip’ (e.g. on an index card) to ascertain student thinking and understanding. Here are Instructions on filling out an Exit Slip and two Exit Slip worksheets.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

Harvard Thinking Routines

Think from The Middle: Strategy Tool Box

The First Brumbies

Katherine England | illustrated by Peter Sheehan

worksheet: Grammar - Adjectives


Understanding EN3-3A

Narrative: Create a story arc to find and summarise the main events of ‘The First Brumbies’, to highlight the conventions of a narrative used by the author, Katherine England. For information on how to use a story arc, read Using a Story Arc or watch this Introduction to the Story Arc YouTube clip. How does the author create empathy toward Sophie? (The author invites students into Sophie’s shoes, to feel her pain.) What role do sympathy and empathy play in the story to carry the plot? How did the author make students understand Sophie’s choice to leave the yard? How did the author engage students in the story? Explore further the English Textual Concept ‘Narrative’.

Mini book review: Using the scaffolded ‘Mini Book Review’ worksheet students can complete and share a review of the story, ‘The First Brumbies’.


Engaging personally EN3-5B & EN3-8D

Character: Create a character map or attribute web about the type of character Sophie is portrayed as in the story, using one of these Character Map and Attribute Web worksheets. Explore how the author constructed the narrative in such a way as to invite an emotional response to evoke empathy, sympathy and/or empathy, and how she interwove point of view as another textual concept. Explore further the English Textual Concept ‘Character’.

Point of view: Write a diary entry from the boy’s point of view, when Sophie and the foal escaped from the yard. Have students re-read page 30 to orientate themselves with the boy’s character. How would he have felt, knowing that it was his fault the gate was left open? How would he explain it to his parents? What emotions would he be feeling? He was trying to help another injured animal when Sophie and the foal escaped … Explore further the English Textual Concept ‘Point of View’.


Connecting EN3-8D

Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.

Text-to-Self: Have a class discussion on how do the ideas in this text relate to students’ own lives, ideas and experiences. Ask students to consider:

  • What I just read reminds me of the time when I …
  • I agree with/understand what I just read because in my own life …
  • I don’t agree with what I just read because in my own life …

Students complete this Double-Entry Journal worksheet to record connections during the reading.

Discuss as a class.

Teaching Strategy explained: Text-to-Text, Text-to-Self, Text-to-World Rationale.


Engaging critically EN3-7B

Conduct a Circle of Viewpoints visible thinking routine to help students consider and perceive different and diverse perspectives presented in the story. Brainstorm a list of different perspectives and then use this script skeleton to explore each one:

  1. I am thinking of ... the topic ... From the point of view of ... the viewpoint you’ve chosen.
  2. I think ... describe the topic from your viewpoint. Be an actor—take on the character of your viewpoint.
  3. A question I have from this viewpoint is ... ask a question from this viewpoint.

Wrap up: What new ideas do you have about the topic that you didn’t have before? What new questions do you have?

Students could record their responses on these Circle of Viewpoints worksheets.

Write a persuasive speech to convince students either that the brumbies should remain free/feral or not. Scaffold arguments using this Persuasion Map worksheet to organise thinking.


Experimenting EN3-7C

Create an infographic, using Canva, about feral animals in Australia.

Create five questions where the answer is brumby/brumbies. For example: Q: What do Australians call feral horses? A: Brumbies.

Animate ‘The First Brumbies’ using Comic Life or draw a simple film strip using this Story Board worksheet.


Reflecting EN3-9E

Conduct an I used to think ... But now I think … routine. This routine helps students to reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I Used to Think … Now I Think … worksheet.

Exit Slips are a formative assessment that can be used to quickly check for understanding. The teacher poses one or two questions in the last couple minutes of class and asks student to fill out an ‘exit slip’ (e.g. on an index card) to ascertain student thinking and understanding. Here are Instructions on filling out an Exit Slip and two Exit Slip worksheets.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

Harvard Thinking Routines

Think from The Middle: Strategy Tool Box

The Kookaburra's Laugh

story by Karen Lieversz | illustrated by David Legge

worksheet:


Understanding EN3-3A

Conduct a Question Starts visible thinking routine to generate creative questions about what the story could be about. Brainstorm a list of at least twelve questions about the story. Use these question-starts to help students think of interesting questions:

  • Why ...?
  • How would it be different if ...?
  • What are the reasons ...?
  • Suppose that ...?
  • What if ...?
  • What if we knew ...?
  • What is the purpose of ...?
  • What would change if ...?

Review the brainstormed list and highlight the questions that seem most interesting. Then, select one or more of the highlighted questions to discuss. Students could use this Question Starts Thinking Routine worksheet to support their learning.

Complete a tree chart (representing Clarice) to show student understanding of ‘friendship’ in relation to the text. Chronologically list all the events that finally led to Jackson becoming the lead sentinel. List the events in the branches of this Tree Chart worksheet.

Find three interesting words from the story. For example: sentinel, cacophony, beacon, seething, pact, unanimous. The Touchdown word of the month, ‘oblivious’, could also be included. Research their meanings and use them to increase student vocabulary in this Vocabulary Graphic Organiser worksheet.


Engaging personally EN3-5B & EN3-8D

Conduct a Step Inside visible thinking routine. This routine is designed to help students look at characters and events differently by exploring different viewpoints. Three core questions guide students in this routine:

  1. What can the person or thing perceive?
  2. What might the person or thing know about or believe?
  3. What might the person or thing care about?

Brainstorm perceptions from the story (focus on page 5). For example, Clarice perceiving the worst: ‘Maybe they are right … Maybe I am an ugly, good for nothing nobody.’; Clarice knowing an evil was coming: ‘Jackson, I’m scared. Way down to my deepest roots …’ What does Clarice care about? Alternatively, focus the thinking routine on Jackson’s perceptions. Students could use on one of these Step Inside worksheets to record responses.

Write a paragraph on, or discuss, who has the role of sentinel in each student’s family. Who watches over them? How do they provide ‘protection and nourishment’ (first paragraph, page 4) for their family? What are the perceived dangers or threats to their family? What precautions does the sentinel take to protect the student’s family? Students can share their thoughts using a Think Pair Share worksheet.


Connecting EN3-8D

Text-to-Text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.

Text-to-Text: How do the ideas in this text remind you of another text (story, book, movie, song, etc.)?

  • What I just read reminds me of (story/book/movie/song) because …
  • The ideas in this text are similar to the ideas in … because …
  • The ideas in this text are different than the ideas in … because …

Students complete the statements using Think Pair Share worksheet or a Connections Text to Text worksheet.

Teaching Strategy explained: Text-to-Text, Text-to-Self, Text-to-World Rationale.


Engaging critically EN3-7B

Intertextuality: Create a persuasive flow chart or infographic using Canva, regarding the importance of protecting Mother Nature, especially in relation to Australia. Scaffold arguments using Persuasion Map Graphic Organiser worksheet to organise thinking and slogan generation. Adapting structure and styles of texts draws on the English Textual Concept ‘Intertextuality’, where texts can be appropriated for audience, purpose, mode or media.

Complete a PMI chart. Encourage students to use their PMI chart to highlight three elements (in three different colours or use coloured post-it notes) within the narrative that are positive, negative and interesting:

  1. Plus/Positive: Good/Positive experiences, themes, messages, events and happenings in the text.
  2. Minus/Negative: Events in the text that are negative/bad experiences in the text, things that go wrong etc.
  3. Interesting: Anything that appeals to the student; questions, feelings and emotions that arise, morals, messages and connections that resonate with the students.

Experimenting EN3-2A & EN3-8C

Identify powerful descriptive language in the text, for example: ‘a seething demon of orange flames’, and outline the significance, purpose and function using this Close Reading: Developing New Understandings worksheet to help students make inferences and develop new understandings.

Design a welcoming inscription for a plaque to honour Clarice or other spotted gums, as safe havens in the Australian bush. Students can select from this Collection of Blank Plaques Cliparts or find other templates in Word.

Create a film strip of ‘The Kookaburra’s Laugh’ using this Story Board worksheet. Option to adapt it into a play or podcast using Audacity.

Create an animation of the story using Vyond.

Write an interesting narrative, recalling a time students have had ‘a feeling in their bones’ (or roots, in Clarice’s case!). Discuss how Clarice knew when she said, ‘Stay close my friends. I have a bad feeling the time is nigh.’ (page 7). Discuss intuition and how sometimes people feel they just know something is going to happen, without any proof. Use a Story Map Graphic Organiser worksheet to help scaffold writing. Option to publish using Storybird or Book Creator.

Remind students that, in order to engage their audience, they need to consider character identification, situations (life struggle) and themes (friendship, pride, danger) to warrant reader interest and build a decent plot. Choosing which ideas will connect with their audience and their language choice, directly influences student writing development.


Reflecting  EN3-9E

Conduct an I used to think ... But now I think … routine. This routine helps students to reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I Used to Think … Now I Think … worksheet.

Exit Slips are a formative assessment that can be used to quickly check for understanding. The teacher poses one or two questions in the last couple minutes of class and asks student to fill out an ‘exit slip’ (e.g. on an index card) to ascertain student thinking and understanding. Here are Instructions on filling out an Exit Slip and two Exit Slip worksheets.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

Harvard Thinking Routines

Think From The Middle Strategy Tool Box

Yum Yum!

article by Susan Letts

worksheet: Comprehension - Facts


Understanding EN3-3A

Complete a Three Facts and a Fib Thinking Routine to ascertain student understanding. This thinking routine gives students the chance to develop their skills in narrowing choices.

Complete an article analysis to demonstrate student understanding of the text using this Article Analysis worksheet.


Engaging personally EN3-5B & EN3-8D

Complete is a Personal Response worksheet about ‘what they have been thinking about lately’ in relation to the article, Yum Yum! to elicit student responses to the text.

Write a pensée poem to describe a real bug meal using one of these Pensee Poem worksheets.


Connecting EN3-8D

Text-To-World connections occur when we relate the text with what we already know about the world.

Text-to-World: How do the ideas in this text relate to the larger world—past, present and future? Students complete the following statements using a Text-to-World Connections worksheet activity:

  • What I just read makes me think about (event from the past) because …
  • What I just read makes me think about (event from today related to my own community, nation or world) because …
  • What I just read makes me wonder about the future because …

Discuss as a class or use a Think, Pair, Share worksheet to record responses.

Teaching Strategy explained: Text-to-Text, Text-to-Self, Text-to-World Rationale.


Engaging critically EN3-7B

Create a three-minute speech persuading an audience that humans indeed need/need not include bugs in their diets. Use the Persuasion Map worksheet to help students see the development of logical arguments in texts, build their own arguments or determine the merit of arguments. This map/scaffold could be used twice; once for content and once to list the techniques used at each stage to enhance the arguments.

Complete a Fact or Opinion chart to help students identify the types of information contained in ‘Yum Yum!’. Ask students to consider how objective or subjective is the author’s portrayal of human bug consumption. Support the statement/topic ‘Humans should eat bugs’ using this Fact and Opinion worksheet and supporting evidence from the text. Fact and opinion charts can also be used to help students understand the different positions represented in texts and look more closely at author purpose and whether facts are fairly presented or if opinions are more prominent.

Conduct a class debate: Does Australia need a ‘Bug Boom’? Locate debating ideas and resources from Strictly Speaking Resources.

Conduct a ‘True for Who?’ thinking routine, which asks students to examine a claim from different points of view. Students look at various viewpoints people can form of a claim, then look at the stance behind a viewpoint and the reasons behind that stance. Students can also identify how various situations might influence the stances people are likely to take. This routine can be used at any point when exploring truths once the truth-claim has been clarified. Students could use this True for Who? Viewpoints Circle worksheet.


Experimenting EN3-7C

Create an infographic using Canva to encourage humans to eat more bugs.

Design a creative three-course menu for a bug-friendly restaurant, for example, The Grasshopper Cafe. Menu templates can be found on Canva or using this Menu Generator.

Explore puns, jokes or idioms that use bugs and illustrate their meaning. For example: ‘Buzz off’; ‘There’s no flies on you’; ‘the bee’s knees’; and Q: What did sushi say to the bee? A: Wassabee?


Reflecting EN3-9E

Conduct an I used to think ... But now I think … routine. This routine helps students to reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I Used to Think … Now I Think … worksheet.

Exit Slips are a formative assessment that can be used to quickly check for understanding. The teacher poses one or two questions in the last couple minutes of class and asks student to fill out an ‘exit slip’ (e.g. on an index card) to ascertain student thinking and understanding. Here are Instructions on filling out an Exit Slip and two Exit Slip worksheets.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

Harvard Thinking Routines

Think from The Middle: Strategy Tool Box

Issue 7 - August 2019

The Green Eye of the Yellow God

J Milton Hayes| Greg Holfeld


Understanding EN3-3A

Story map The Green Eye of the Yellow God. Students could use this Story Map worksheet to record their responses.

Adapt the narrative story map (above) into an ‘action’ script for a play to perform as a mime.

Find three interesting words from the text. Research their meaning and use them to increase student vocabulary in this Interesting Words worksheet. For example, colonel, jestingly, tunic, bade, upbraided, barrack, vengeance and TSM word of the month, frisson.


Engaging Personally EN3-2A, EN3-5B & EN 3-8D

Writea mini monologue to perform in front of the class. Encourage students to use concise, succinct writing that's emotionally charged and written in first person narrative. Download free lesson plan and resources from TES Mini-monologue. For more detailed monologue writing ideas visit Hobby Lark How-To-Create-A-Monologue-Easy-And-Simple.


Connecting EN3-8D

Text – Text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.

Text-to-Text: How do the ideas in this text remind you of another text (story, book, movie, song, etc)? Complete one of the following statements:

  • What I just read reminds me of (story/book/movie/song) because…
  • The ideas in this text are similar to the ideas in … because…
  • The ideas in this text are different than the ideas in … because…

Students complete the statements using Text to Text printable worksheets.

Teaching Strategy explained: /text-text-text-self-text-world


Engaging Critically EN3-7B

Analyse and discuss this quote by the author/actor J Milton Hayes: ‘I wrote The Green Eye of the Little Yellow God in five hours, but I had it all planned out. It isn't poetry and it does not pretend to be, but it does what it sets out to do.’

Is it poetry or not? Can a monologue be poetry? Can writing pretend? What is the purpose of the text? What did J Milton Hayes set out to do when he wrote The Green Eye of the Yellow God?

Complete a PMI chart Encouragestudents to highlight 3 elements (in three different colours or use coloured post-it notes) within the narrative that are Positive, Minus (negative) and Interesting.

  • 1) Plus/Positive: Good/Positive experiences, themes, messages, events and happenings in the text.
  • 2) Minus/Negative: Events in the text that are negative/bad experiences in the text, things that go wrong etc.
  • 3) Interesting: Anything that appeals to the student; questions, feelings and emotions that arise, morals, messages and connections that resonate with the students.

Experimenting EN3-2A & EN3-8C

Connotation, Imagery and Symbol: Choose textual imagery from the poem and draw depictions of each stanza. Have students work in pairs to produce a class mural of The Green Eye of the Yellow God. Discuss, in depth how sustained images run as a thread of meaning in the text, guiding interpretation and indicating thematic elements. Which words signify more than what they denote? More than their literal meaning? What or where is the figurative language within the text? Does it extend the meaning of the text? Consider the culturally specific content of the poem and how that influences student understanding. Explore further English Textual Concept ‘Connotation, Imagery and Symbol’.

Perform The Green Eye of the Yellow God, as a reader’s theatre. Students work in groups to practise the performance of a script. Multiple readings of the text, through rehearsal offers opportunities to address fluency, phrasing, intonation and voice production.

Write a poem that comes full circle. Use elements from The Green Eye of the Yellow God and this quote to inspire student writing, ‘Then that final ending where you began. It carries people back. You've got a compact whole. A broken-hearted woman tends the grave of Mad Carew. They'll weave a whole story round that woman's life. Every man's a novelist at heart. We all tell ourselves stories. That's what you've got to play on.’ J Milton Hayes.

Write a Bio Poem about J Milton Hayes using this scaffolded worksheet How to write a biography poem.

Create a film strip of ‘The Green Eye of the yellow God’ and adapt it into a play. Option to record as a podcast using audacity.

Create an animation of the text using Vyond.


Reflecting EN3-9E

Conduct a I used to think...Now I think routine to help students reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I used to think...now I think worksheet.

Exit Slips are a formative assessment that can be used to quickly check for understanding. The teacher poses one or two questions in the last couple minutes of class and asks student to fill out an ‘exit slip’ (e.g. on an index card) to ascertain student thinking and understanding. Here are Instructions on filling out an Exit Slip and two Exit Slip worksheets.


A World of Science

story by John O’Brien | illustrated by Craig Phillips


Understanding EN3-3A

Character: Completea character organisation worksheet to illustrate how John O’Brien reveals clues to help students get to know Aleth Greenwood. This Character Development worksheet helps students focus and analyse four ways in which an author develops characters: physical description of the character, character’s words and actions, what others say about the character, direct commentary by the narrator. Explore further the English Textual Concept ‘Character’.

Conduct a Question Starts visible thinking routine to generate creative questions about what the story could be about. Brainstorm a list of at least twelve questions about the story. Use these question-starts to help students think of interesting questions:

  • Why ...?
  • How would it be different if ...?
  • What are the reasons ...?
  • Suppose that ...?
  • What if ...?
  • What if we knew ...?
  • What is the purpose of ...?
  • What would change if ...?

Review the brainstormed list and highlight the questions that seem most interesting. Then, select one or more of the highlighted questions to discuss. Students could use this Question Starts Thinking Routine worksheet to support their learning.


Engaging personally EN3-5B & EN3-8D

Representation is the depiction of a thing, person or idea in written, visual, digital, performed or spoken language and conventions.

Discuss: How has Aleth Greenwood been represented? How are students influenced by the images? How are students responding to the language used to describe Aleth? How does the representation of Aleth make students feel? Ask for examples from the text to support student understanding. For example, ‘I have been tortured, wounded and killed many times in battle, and I have come to hate the pain and violence that have endlessly ruled my life.’ What role does the silent character of Hugo Lessing play? How is Hugo portrayed by Aleth? What message is John O’Brien delivering to young gamers? Encourage students to move beyond making meaningless statements (such as, good or bad) by providing a list of words depicting positive and negative emotions. Students could use a Think, Pair, Share worksheet to record their ideas and scaffold discussion.

Students justify their responses by using a stem such as:

- The representation of Aleth made me feel … because …

- John O’Brien has used … to represent …

- Positive: interested, satisfied, pleased, surprised, reassured, comforted, optimistic, curious

- Negative: irritated, incensed, disappointed, discouraged, upset, perplexed, unsure, frustrated.

Explore further the English Textual Concept 'Representation'


Connecting EN3-8D

Text-to-Text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.

Text-to-Text: How do the ideas in this text remind you of another text (story, book, movie, song, etc.)?

  • What I just read reminds me of (story/book/movie/song) because …
  • The ideas in this text are similar to the ideas in … because …
  • The ideas in this text are different than the ideas in … because …

Students complete the statements using Think Pair Share worksheet or a Connections Text to Text worksheet.

Teaching Strategy explained: Text-to-Text, Text-to-Self, Text-to-World Rationale.


Engaging critically EN3-7B

Conduct a Circle of View Points Visible Thinking Routine to help student consider and perceive different and diverse perspectives presented in the story. Brainstorm a list of different perspectives and then use this script skeleton to explore each one:

  1. I am thinking of ... the topic... From the point of view of ... the viewpoint you've chosen
  2. I think ... describe the topic from your viewpoint. Be an actor - take on the character of your viewpoint
  3. A question I have from this viewpoint is ... ask a question from this viewpoint

Wrap up: What new ideas do you have about the topic that you didn't have before? What new questions do you have?

Students could record their responses on these Circle of View Points worksheets.

Write a persuasive speech to convince students whether or not the people should play video games. Scaffold arguments using a persuasion scaffold to organise thinking.


Experimenting EN3-2A & EN3-8C

Design a character that would live and fight in the world of Murlock Grune.

Identify powerful descriptive language in the text, for example: ‘He wanted to endlessly fly Sky Master into battle, wielding Diamond Fire and slaughtering goblins, war-wolves and shape shifters’ and outline the significance, purpose and function using this Close Reading: Developing New Understandings worksheet to help students make inferences and develop new understandings.

Design a map of Murlock Grune using information located within the text, as well as student imagination.

Write a diamante poem titled, ‘Hugo’ and his transformation into Prince Lionheart. Brainstorm student ideas about how the author has portrayed Hugo through Aleth’s eyes and how this may be a bias view. Discuss fact and opinion and which point of view the audience has been given about Hugo.  Students could use this diamante printable to record their ideas.

Write a persuasive warning letter to Hugo about what might happen if he continues to use the back door into Murlock Grune. How will students convince Hugo that his ordinary life is better than being Prince Lionheart?

Create an animation of the story, A World of Science using Vyond.

Writean interesting narrative titled ‘Possessed’ using a similar plot to the one in A World of Science. Brainstorm ideas as a class to ensure creativity and multiple story lines. Students could use a Story Map Graphic Organiser worksheet to help scaffold writing. Option to publish using Storybird or Book Creator.

Remind students that, in order to engage their audience, they need to consider character identification, situations (family life) and themes (life choices) to warrant reader interest and build a decent plot. Choosing which ideas will connect with their audience and their language choice, directly influences student writing development.


Reflecting EN3-9E

Conduct an I used to think ... But now I think … routine. This routine helps students to reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I Used to Think … Now I Think … worksheet.

Exit Slips are a formative assessment that can be used to quickly check for understanding. The teacher poses one or two questions in the last couple minutes of class and asks student to fill out an ‘exit slip’ (e.g. on an index card) to ascertain student thinking and understanding. Here are Instructions on filling out an Exit Slip and two Exit Slip worksheets.


Sister Elizabeth Kenny - The Nurse from the Bush

article by Jacqui Halpin | illustrated by Marjorie Crosby-Fairall


Understanding EN3-3A

Complete a Three Facts and a Fib thinking routineto ascertain student understanding. This thinking routine gives students the chance to develop their skills in narrowing choices.

Complete an article analysis to demonstrate student understanding of the text using this Article Analysis worksheet.


Engaging personally EN3-5B & EN3-8D

Create a tribute video to the miraculous feats of pioneering Sister Elizabeth Kenny using either iMovie or Microsoft Movie Maker. View a short example (1:34min) on YouTube Sister Elizabeth Kenny to assist student understanding of how to present information and images to entertain and inform an audience. For students and teachers new to filming visit The Australian Centre for the Moving Image for an abundance of resources.

Point of View: Write a diary entry by Sister Elizabeth Kenny about one of the many momentous days of her life, outlined in the article. Experimenting with point of view allows students to explore other ways of seeing. Explore further English Textual Concept ‘Point of View’.


Connecting EN3-8D

Background reading: Strategy explained: text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world

  • Text-to-text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.
  • Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.
  • Text-to-world connections occur when we relate the text with what we already know about the world.

Text-to-World: How do the ideas in this text relate to the larger world—past, present and future.

  • What I just read makes me think about (event from the past) because …
  • What I just read makes me think about (event from today related to my own community, nation or world) because …
  • What I just read makes me wonder about the future because …

Discuss as a class or use a Think, Pair, Share worksheet.


Engaging critically EN3-7B

Create a three-minute speech persuading an audience that Sister Elizabeth Kenny was a miracle worker, despite what doctors thought at the time. This Persuasion Map worksheet is a useful tool to help students see the development of logical arguments in texts, build their own arguments or determine the merit of arguments. This map/scaffold could be used twice; once for content and once to list the techniques used at each stage to enhance the arguments.

Complete a fact or opinion chart to help students identify the information contained in ‘Sister Elizabeth Kenny-Nurse from the Bush’. Ask students to consider how objective/subjective is the author’s portrayal of Sister Elizabeth. Students should support the statement/topic ‘She had a sharp mind and a gift for healing’ using this Fact and Opinion worksheet and evidence from the text. Fact and opinion charts can also be used to help students understand the different positions represented in texts and look more closely at cultural factors.


Experimenting EN3-7C

Writea biography poem about Sister Elizabeth Kenny, using the information in the article       and this Write a Biography Poem worksheet.

Create an infographic, using Canva, about poliomyelitis or vaccination.

Write an ode to Sister Elizabeth Kenny, using this Writing an Ode worksheet.

Conduct a ‘True for Who?’ thinking routine, which asks students to examine a claim from different points of view. Students look at various viewpoints people can form of a claim, then look at the stance behind a viewpoint and the reasons behind that stance. Students can also identify how various situations might influence the stances people are likely to take. This routine can be used at any point when exploring truths once the truth-claim has been clarified. Students could use this True for Who? Viewpoints Circle worksheet.


Reflecting EN3-9E

Conduct an I used to think ... But now I think … routine. This routine helps students to reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I Used to Think … Now I Think … worksheet.

Exit Slips are a formative assessment that can be used to quickly check for understanding. The teacher poses one or two questions in the last couple minutes of class and asks student to fill out an ‘exit slip’ (e.g. on an index card) to ascertain student thinking and understanding. Here are Instructions on filling out an Exit Slip and two Exit Slip worksheets.


Two Gun Tess-Pride of the West

play by Pauline Hosking | illustrated by Aska


Understanding EN3-3A

Create a detailed story plot graph of ‘Two Gun Tess-Pride of the West’ using this scaffolded Story Plot Graph worksheet.

Complete a Three Facts and a Fib thinking routine to ascertain student understanding. This thinking routine gives students the chance to develop their skills in narrowing choices.


Engaging personally EN3-5B & 3-8A

Point of View: Writea letter from Tess’s proud sheriff father, to Two Gun Tess congratulating her on her ingenious plan to catch the cattle rustlers. Encourage students to use familial language, endearing terms and genuine pride to enhance their creative writing endeavours. Explore further the English Textual Concept ‘Point of View’.

Complete a Responding to Literature worksheet to encourage students’ personal responses to the play.


Connecting EN3-8D

Text-to-Text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.

Text-to-Text: How do the ideas in this text remind you of another text (story, book, movie, song, etc.)? Complete one of the following statements:

  • What I just read reminds me of (story/book/movie/song) because …
  • The ideas in this text are similar to the ideas in … because …
  • The ideas in this text are different than the ideas in … because …

Students complete a Text-to-Self Connections worksheet and can discuss as a class.

Teaching Strategy explained: Text-to-Text, Text-to-Self, Text-to-World Rationale.


Engaging critically EN3-7B

Complete a PMI chart. Encouragestudents to use their PMI chart to highlight three elements (in three different colours or use coloured post-it notes) within the narrative that are positive, negative and interesting:

  1. Plus/Positive: Good/Positive experiences, themes, messages, events and happenings in the text.
  2. Minus/Negative: Events in the text that are negative/bad experiences in the text, things that go wrong etc.
  3. Interesting: Anything that appeals to the student; questions, feelings and emotions that arise, morals, messages and connections that resonate with the students.

Experimenting EN3-7C

Write an Australian version or retelling of ‘Two Gun Tess-Pride of the West’ as a narrative or a reader’s theatre script. Change the characters, setting, title and accents (use Australian slang), only keeping the complication and resolution similar. Students could use a Narrative Idea Pyramid worksheet to organise their ideas before writing. Option to perform in front of the class.

Create a film strip of ‘Two Gun Tess-Pride of the West’ using this Story Map Organiser worksheet. Option to adapt into a podcast using Audacity.

Perform the play using puppets.

Adapt the play into a limerick about a new sheriff in Coyote Canyon. Students could use this limerick graphic organiser to write their poems.

Interview Two Gun Tess and Deputy Pee Wee after their first successful arrest. To assist students with writing interview questions and transcripts, download ABC’s Helpful Student Tip Sheet.


Reflecting EN3-9E

Conduct an I used to think ... But now I think … routine. This routine helps students to reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I Used to Think … Now I Think … worksheet.

Exit Slips are a formative assessment that can be used to quickly check for understanding. The teacher poses one or two questions in the last couple minutes of class and asks student to fill out an ‘exit slip’ (e.g. on an index card) to ascertain student thinking and understanding. Here are Instructions on filling out an Exit Slip and two Exit Slip worksheets.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

Harvard Thinking Routines

Think from The Middle: Strategy Tool Box