A History Through Chimneys

poem by Kaye Baillie , illustrated by Gabriel Evans

Four brick chimneys stand rooted to the ground like ancient trees. 

Pillars of red bricks and yesterday’s paint, 

blackened by years of use 

mark the spot in this barren lot where a house once stood. 

 

Birds are the only visitors now, perched high on the sooty squares 

watching the wind ruffled grass dance at the base of the chimneys 

and feeling the ghosts of who knows who once lived there. 

 

Who was it that once gathered in the lounge on the rug 

sharing stories while someone knitted in the old rocking chair  

warmed by the rollicking orange flames? 

 

Did children scurry off to bed where another fire  

cosied them to slip out of day clothes 

and into nightdresses?  

 

When little sleepy eyes finally closed 

did parents retreat to their warm chamber 

to rest up before another day? 

 

Who filled the early morning air with the smell of hot bread 

and the comfort of good things to eat 

splashing hot water into mugs of cocoa 

while little backs warmed by the old black stove? 

 

Then did someone leave the warm house 

huddled inside a coat 

taking the path to the old truck in the shed  

to rumble out into another day? 

 

And who came home each night 

following wafting curling white whispers from the chimneys 

that promised food and warmth 

and best of all 

promised that someone was home?