Learning resources for each school magazine include strategies for at least 2 of the stories/poems or plays within each issue. Teachers can utilise these texts and strategies from each magazine in the classroom. The Learning Resources are designed to connect your students to the text and to provide higher order thinking strategies as well as  other literacy ideas.

The strategies for each text can be used as a whole lesson or as small group or individual work in your classrooms.

Learning Resources can also be downloaded in PDF format for your convenience:
Issue 1 - Issue 2 - Issue 3

Issue 1 - February, 2019


poem by Sophie Masson, illustrated by Jenny Tan


Outcomes:


EN3-2A
Understand and appreciate the way texts are shaped through exploring a range of
language forms and features and ideas
Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive texts, choosing and
experimenting with text structures, language features, images and digital resources
appropriate to purpose and audience (ACELY1704, ACELY1714)
EN 3-3A
Understand, interpret and experiment with sound devices and imagery, include
simile, metaphor and personification, in narratives, shape poetry, songs, anthems
and odes (ACELT1611)
EN3-7C
Create literary texts that adapt or combine aspects of texts students have experience
in innovative ways (ACELT1612, ACELT1618)

English Textual Concept: Connotation, Imagery and Symbol



Learning Activities

Connecting to the text


Ask the students to close their eyes. Play them the a short audio piece of relaxing
river sounds: youtube.com/watch?v=IvjMgVS6kng
Encourage students to picture the river; the flow of the water; the plants and trees
along the riverbank. Ask them to write down five words that come to mind as they
listen to the soothing sounds. Make a class word-bank with these words.


Imagery


Read the poem ‘Long Neck’ aloud to students, asking them to listen carefully to the
words. What images does the poem conjure up? How has the author used language
to appeal to our senses? What phrases has the author used to describe the look and
feel of the river? From whose point of view is the poem written?


Figurative language


The author compares the turtle to a rock; a submarine; an excavator; and a crawler
looking for gold. In small groups, ask students to think of a different animal and
come up with three things that it could be compared to—e.g. a shark could be
compared to a silent predator; a shadow waiting in the dark; a garbage disposal.


Poetic structure


Ask the students to look closely at the structure of the poem. Does it contain
stanzas? Are there any rhyming patterns? Discuss the concept of ‘free verse’ poetry
and the fact that there are no real rhythms or patterns. Explain to the students that
this structure allows authors to put words together in all sorts of ways. View other
examples of Australian free verse poetry:


Interview with Neridah McMullin

Poem of the Day

Joint construction of a free verse poem


Write the word ‘River’ on the whiteboard and ask students what thoughts come to
mind when they hear that word. Answers may include: free-flowing; peaceful; a
source of food; a winding snake; a powerful beast etc.
Begin the poem by combining the word ‘river’ with one of the brainstormed
suggestions—e.g. The river is a winding snake that coils around itself.
Discuss the term metaphor (the river is being likened to a winding snake). Choose
another one of the class suggestions to use in the next line. This time, include the
word ‘as’ or ‘like’ to reinforce the use of simile—e.g.
It roars angrily, as mighty as a powerful beast.
Continue to draw on the students’ suggestions to jointly construct another three or
four lines.


Changing it up


‘Long Neck’ is about a turtle in a river. Tell students that they are going to work in
pairs to create their own free verse poem about a different animal in a different
habitat. They may choose a giraffe from a savannah, a hippo from a river/lake, a
whale from the ocean etc. Using a graphic organiser (or word web), have students
come up with words or phrases that describe their animal. Encourage them to think
of two or three objects to which their animal could be compared—e.g. a whale could
be compared to a semitrailer or a submarine.
Provide each pair of students with two dice. Students start by rolling the two dice;
this will determine the number of lines in their free verse poem. Once the line length
is established, students roll the dice again to determine how many words will be in
the first line. They roll the dice for each new line of the poem. The number on the
dice will equal the number of words in that line. Remind students to incorporate
metaphors and similes where possible. Students can read their poems aloud, if they
feel comfortable.


Publishing


Now it’s time to publish! Ask students to find a digital image of their chosen animal.
There’s a wide variety at Pics4Learning

Students can place their image in PowerPoint, Google Docs, Paint or another similar
program and add their poem to the image. You may like to combine all of the poems
to create a digital book of poetry.

Further reading


* Rivertime by Trace Balla
* Rockhopping by Trace Balla

.

article by Jenny Robson

Outcomes:


EN3-1A
Plan, rehearse and deliver presentations, selecting and sequencing appropriate content and multimodal elements for defined audiences and purposes, making appropriate choices for modality and emphasis (ACELY1700, ACELY1710)

Discuss and experiment with ways to strengthen and refine spoken texts in order to entertain, inform, persuade or inspire the audience

EN3-3A
Analyse how text structures and language features work together to meet the purpose of a text (ACELY1711)

EN3-5B
Identify and use a variety of strategies to present information and opinions across a range of texts

English Textual Concept: Authority


Learning Activities

Connect to text


Before looking at the article, play the opening of Beethoven’s fifth symphony: youtube.com/watch?v=_4IRMYuE1hI
Turn the volume up for maximum effect. Ask the students if they’ve heard this piece of music before. How did it make them feel? Can they guess who wrote the piece? Discuss the term ‘symphony’— a musical composition for a full orchestra.


KWL Chart

Tell students that they are going to read an article about Beethoven. In small groups, guide students through the process of setting up a KWL Chart: K–What we know: W – What we want to find out: L – what we learned
Have the groups fill out the first two columns before reading the text.

Delving into nonfiction

Before reading, ask students what the purpose of a nonfiction text is (to explain, inform and persuade). At a glance, how does the reader know that it’s a nonfiction text (subheadings, caption, photographs). The authority of a text can be determined by looking at the appropriateness of its style; the language, spelling and punctuation; and whether or not the information is clearly explained. Ask students to read the article (individually or in small groups), highlighting any unfamiliar words as they go. Ensure students research these words after reading. Discuss the authority of the text. Did the students feel as though the information was clearly explained? Did the subheadings make it easier to read? Were the images suitable for the text? Did students feel that it was a reliable source of information? Have students return to their groups to complete the final column of their KWL chart.

Hot seat

Ask for volunteers to take on the role of Beethoven. In turn, each child has a go at sitting in the ‘hot seat’ at the front of the class, pretending to be Beethoven. The rest of the class ask questions that they would like to know the answers to. Encourage them to steer away from ‘yes’ and ‘no’ responses. Ask them to think of questions that would really help them to know more about Ludwig van Beethoven.


Think Pair Share


Pose the question: If Beethoven were alive today, what advice do you think he would give to his younger self? In pairs or small groups, ask students to come up with an answer to this question. When finished, students share their answers with the rest of the class.


Conducting an interview


Discuss the role that resilience and commitment played in Beethoven’s success. Brainstorm other people who have had to overcome adversity to achieve great things e.g. Kurt Fearnley, Turia Pitt, Stephen Hawking. In pairs, ask students to choose and research a person who inspires them. When students have had time to look closely at their chosen person, tell them that they are going to conduct a ‘mock’ interview. One member of the pair will take on the role of their chosen person, and the other member will take on the role of interviewer. Together, the pair are to write a script for the interview. Students may like to watch the short video on How to make News to help them


Once the video is scripted, students conduct the interview. Students may like to partner up with another pair to film each other’s interviews. The videos can be shared with the rest of the class.


Further reading


Wonder by RJ Palacio
Ugly by Robert Hoge

.

Issue 2 - March, 2019


story by Jane Jolly

illustrated by Anna Bron


Connecting to the text EN3-8D/ACELT1613

Do the ideas in the text remind you of another text (a book, song, movie, story, etc)?

Discuss the following statements:

  • What I just read reminds me of (story/book/movie/song) because …
  • The ideas in this text are similar to the ideas in … because …
  • The ideas in this text are different than the ideas in … because …

Complete a making connections document to help students analyse and explain the ways in which particular texts relate to their cultural experiences and the culture of others.

Extension: Create a Venn diagram to compare the two texts.


Evocative Imagery EN3-5B

Evocative Imageryis used throughout this story, creating a unique sensory experience. Rosie (Jane Jolly) shares her experiences from her point of view (POV), placing the reader in her shoes, amplifying empathy. Ask children to highlight all the images, senses, similes and metaphors Jane Jolly uses to make the reader/audience feel like they are in Saigon. Discuss how this influences an audience. Why is imagery so important? What purposes does imagery serve?

Create a sensory poem/riddle that takes the reader to another destination.

Support: Scaffold with the senses: I see; I feel; I hear; I smell: I touch. Where am I?

Extension: Include the TSM word of the month, ‘redoubtable’, in the poem.


Building a narrative EN3-2A/ACELY1704/ACELY1714

Create a narrative titled ‘Daughter/Son of War’ exploring POV as a concept. Explore how Jane Jolly has positioned students to respond in a particular way. How did she create a more personal or empathetic response from her audience? Ask students to consider who will narrate their stories. Consider character voice as the focal point. Use a story arc to plan the conventions of a narrative. Identify characters, events, places, skilful plot development, perceptible mood, narrative voice and evocative images that complement the story.

Support: Narrative Idea Pyramid

Extension: Present the narrative using Storybird or Book Creator


Personal journeys EN3-1A/ACELY1700/ACELY1710

Interview family members or neighbours about their ‘journey to Australia’. Present the information as a Harmony Day Talk like Mai did in ‘She Came in a Shoebox’.

Support: Liaise with the EALD teacher to support and assist students in their resource collection.


Harmony Day EN3-2A/ACELY1701/ACELY1714

Createa wordle or a poster to illustrate where all the students’ families come from. Discuss the Harmony Day slogan ‘Everyone Belongs’. What does belong mean? What does belong feel like? How can we help Australians live in harmony?

Createa Mind Map with harmony as the key. Link suggestions to make Australia a place where we all belong.

Createinvitations for parents to join in Harmony Day celebrations.

Adapt the article ‘Harmony Day’ from p.29 into an infographic or poster marking the 20-year anniversary of Harmony Day canva.com.


Letter writing EN3-2A/ACELY1701/ACELY1714

Writea letter from Mai to Rosie. Use your imagination. How did Mai find Rosie? What would Rosie want to know about Mai? Brainstorm ideas as a class to support a diverse range of responses and creative life stories.

Support: Model letter writing and display question ideas.

Extension: Write a reply from Rosie to Mai.


Getting into character EN3-8D/ACELT1613

Perform a hot seat activity where students can explore the points of views of Mai and Rosie. Perform as a class. Students can pose questions to Mai or Rosie. How to play Hot Seat


Further reading

The Little Refugee by Anh Do and Suzanne Do

May Tang: A New Australian by Katrina Beikoff (part of ‘A New Australian’ series by various authors)

The Unforgotten Coat by Frank Cottrell Boyce

The Arrival by Shaun Tan

Suri’s Wall by Lucy Estela

Resources

Harmony Day

Twinkl

Harmony Day Resources

POV by Anthony Browne YouTube

story by Kathryn England

Illustrated by Douglas Holgate


Connecting to the text EN3-8D/ACELT1613

Students share immediate, instinctive thoughts on the story. Discuss using a PMI chart as a partner activity or as a whole class.

OR

Making Connections: Show students how their informed understanding may have changed or influenced their response to the text.

Complete making connections document to help students analyse and explain the ways in which particular texts relate to their cultural experiences and the culture of others.


Story arc EN3-2A

Create a story arc to demonstrate the conventions of a narrative. Identify characters, events, places, skilful plot development, perceptible mood, narrative voice and evocative images that complement the story.

Narrative Concept: English Textual Concepts

Support: Narrative Idea Pyramid


The power of persuasion EN3-2A/ACELY1704/ACELY1714

Write a persuasive argument about why we should or shouldn’t have homework. Consider research to support arguments with statistics and real-world evidence. Organise thinking using persuasive map and other downloads to support students.

Organise students into small groups, assigning half the students the ‘for homework’ position and the other half the ‘against homework’ position. Encourage students to come up with three points to justify their side of the argument.

Support: Some students may like to work in pairs to come up with their three points.


Joking around EN3-1A

Compose Knock-Knock jokes and explore puns reminiscent of Mr Kirk.

Knock, Knock. Who’s there?

Canoe. Canoe who?

Canoe help me with my homework?

Find the funniest jokes and record students’ voices using Audacity. Find jokes at Funology


Greetings EN3-2A

Make a poster to illustrate greetings from languages other than English spoken in the classroom or known by the students.

Is your classroom as multicultural as Mr Kirk’s?


Popular or not? EN3-3A

Createa mind map describing what characteristics or attributes make a great teacher, using Mr Kirk as a springboard for ideas. Can a teacher give lots of homework and still be popular? Why? Try and rank the attributes as a class


Making connections EN3-3A/ACELT1611

Using the structure of the poem ‘The Birdbath’ on page 24, ask students to write an ode about another inanimate object found in a school. An ode is a poem that admires something ordinary or shows the importance of something that is usually overlooked. An ode does not have to rhyme but includes detailed descriptions and observations. Ode Scaffold


Further reading

Visible Thinking Routines

Scan Vol. 35 Peer Reviewed Article

Resources

Narrative PowerPoint

How to write an ode

Narrative Template

Funny Puns

Persuasive Rubrics

Narrative Idea Pyramid

Issue 3 - April, 2019


Aircraftwoman 104916

article by Kaye Baillie | illustrated by Marjorie Crosby-Fairall


Connecting to the text EN3-8D

Background reading: Strategy explained: text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world

  • Text-to-text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.
  • Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.
  • Text-to-world connections occur when we relate the text with what we already know about the world.

Text-to-World: How do the ideas in this text relate to the larger world—past, present and future.

  • What I just read makes me think about (event from the past) because …
  • What I just read makes me think about (event from today related to my own community, nation or world) because …
  • What I just read makes me wonder about the future because …

Discuss as a class or use a worksheet from Think, Pair, Share.


Create EN3-7C

Create a script for a news reporter interviewing Dulcie before she leaves, or upon her return. Use iMovie or Microsoft Movie Maker

Create an advertisement to encourage tourists to visit the Australian War Memorial

Use the SCAMPER technique to come up with a new advertisement to join the Australian Airforce. Students could refer to an example from the RAAF’s ‘Airforce: Accomplished’ recruitment campaign.

Create a three-minute speech persuading an audience to donate to Legacy.

Create a six-word memoir or other poem about the death of an Australian soldier using Google Slides.

Write an ode to commemorate an Australian soldier or airperson. Students could refer to this Writing an Ode worksheet.

Research Morse code. Present findings to the class, SOS!


Author purpose EN3-7B

Watch Finding Author’s Purpose, which explains the ‘PIE’ model: was it to Persuade, Inform or Entertain? Discuss what Kaye Baillie’s intention/purpose is?

Identify evidence in the text using the Author’s Purpose worksheet to support student thinking and analysis of the text.

Discuss the English Textual Concept Style, which refers to the characteristic ways that composers choose to express ideas in a variety of modes.

How has Kaye Baillie used semantics, structure, form, design and point of view to influence the audience? What language choices and images (note they were her own photos) have been chosen and how do they impact our interpretation?


Finding evidence EN3-8D

Conduct a Here Now / There Then Routine to consider present attitudes and judgments. This thinking routine encourages students to consider past perspectives and develop a better understanding of how thinking changes over time and across cultures.

Connect to text Use the scaffold in the poem ‘The Outlaw’ (page 33), to write about the plight of returned servicemen and servicewomen, Anzac Day or war.

Write a biography poem titled ‘Lest we Forget’

Write a biography of an Australian war veteran or war widow, using one of the biography worksheets.

See, think, wonderthinking routine using the image of Dulcie on page 14.

Support: Write poem without rhyme or brainstorm rhyming words prior to writing.

Extension: Use rhyme, rap or prose.


Wonderful words EN3-1A & EN3-6B

Research and create a crossword about Anzac Day, using this free crossword maker or crossword puzzle creator, or these Anzac Day resources. Use the crossword on page 34 of Orbit as a guide for suitable questions. Remember answers can only be letters or words, not numbers.

Create a True/False quiz from the text.

Write a diary entry for Dulcie on the night of 3 September 1939, when she heard PM Menzies announce Australia is at war.

Support: Question Creation Chart.

Extension: Students compose question cards for the class or create a Kahoot.


Map it out EN3-5B

Story map the main events of Dulcie’s day, starting at 6.00 am, with one of these Story Map worksheets, or by using a Story Arc.

Create a character map or attribute web of the text.


Reflecting EN3-9E

I used to think ... But now I thinkAsk students to reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. A useful routine is I used to think ... But now I think … It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions and beliefs.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

Anzac Day Commemoration Committee website

Anzac Day: What does it mean to you today?

Australian Airforce: Our mission

Australian War Memorial

Debating and Public Speaking Resource

Thinking Routines

Bones the Rescue Dog

story by Alison Ferguson | illustrated by Douglas Holgate


Connecting to the text  EN3-8D

Background reading: Strategy explained: text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world

  • Text-to-text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.
  • Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.
  • Text-to-world connections occur when we relate the text with what we already know about the world.

Text-to-World: How do the ideas in this text relate to the larger world—past, present and future.

  • What I just read makes me think about (event from the past) because …
  • What I just read makes me think about (event from today related to my own community, nation or world) because …
  • What I just read makes me wonder about the future because …

Students complete a Text-to-World worksheet activity.

Discuss as a class or use a worksheet from Think, Pair, Share.


Get creative EN3-8C

Adapt ‘Bones the Rescue Dog’ into a poem using Anzac Ted YouTube as an example.

Create a podcast of the story using Audacity. How to create a podcast

Write about your feelings in relation to Australian animal war heroes. Watch AWAMO YouTube to inspire writing.

Design a memorial to commemorate an animal war hero of your choice.

Write or retell an interesting war animal story using real life heroes like ‘Bones’ or read 10 animal war stories to generate more ideas. Use one of these narrative graphic story organisers .

Write a biography poem about your animal war hero.

Present a 2 minute news report on Anzac Day in Australia. Use YouTube news clip from https://anzacday.org.au/ to support your news story.


Cube a thought EN3-7B

Clarify and demonstrate understanding using the cube template. Supported by their peers, students practise articulating their views and deepen their understanding of the text or themes depending on teacher direction.


Step Inside

Step insideis a visible thinking routine designed to get inside viewpoints. Three core questions guide students in this routine:

  1. What can the person or thing perceive?
  2. What might the person or thing know about or believe?
  3. What might the person or thing care about?

The story evokes feelings of kindness, patriotism, loyalty, bravery and several morals: one good turn deserves another, you give what you get, what goes around comes around, do unto others. Brainstorm perceptions from the story and use them as story titles.


Map it out EN3-5B

Story map the main events of ‘Bones the Rescue Dog’, with one of these Story Map worksheets, or by using a Story Arc.

Adapt your story map and perform as a mime.


Find out EN3-7C

Design an itinerary for an Australian wanting to travel to Gallipoli for Anzac Day. Remember they need to arrive by dawn on 25 April.

Research Gallipoli. Where is it? What happened? Why? When? How? Who? A useful summary is the piece ‘Gallipoli today’, by Ross Bastiaan, OAM.

Write and research a biography of an Australian animal war hero, using one of the biography worksheets.


Reflecting EN3-9E

I used to think ... But now I think … This routine helps students to reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

Anzac Day Commemoration Committee website

Anzac Day: What does it mean to you today?

Australian War Memorial

Books on War Australia

Harvard Thinking Routines

Nobody’s Perfect

story by Jenny Robson | illustrated by Anna Bron


Connecting to the text EN3-8D

Background reading: Strategy explained: text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world

  • Text-to-text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.
  • Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.
  • Text-to-world connections occur when we relate the text with what we already know about the world.

Text-to-self: Have a class discussion on how the ideas in this text relate to their own lives, ideas and experiences? Ask students to consider:

  • What does this text remind you of?
  • Can you relate to the characters in the text?
  • Does anything in this text remind you of anything in your own life?
  • I understand what I just read because in my own life …
  • I don’t agree with what I just read because in my own life …

Students complete this double entry journal worksheet or connections document to record connections during the reading.

Discuss as a class or use a worksheet from Think, Pair, Share.


Get creative EN3-8C

Adapt ‘Nobody’s Perfect’ into a play. The story can be easily appropriated as it has a lot of dialogue. Children can simply highlight their roles straight from their Orbit magazine.

Create a podcast of the play using audacity. How to create a podcast

Write about your feelings in relation to your family. Do you have an annoying sibling? Have your parents told lies in the past? Retell an interesting family tale or make one up using one of these graphic story organisers.


Map it out EN3-5B

Story map the main events of ‘Nobody’s Perfect’, with one of these Story Map worksheets, or by using a Story Arc.

Adapt story map and perform as a mime.


That’s interesting EN3-7B

Write a letter to author Jenny Robson, using the writing a letter to the author guidelines and worksheets and the Praise Question Polish scaffold.Encouragestudents to highlight three elements within the narrative that they would Praise, Question and Polish:

  • Praise: What I like about the author’s writing style or ideas.
  • Questions: For the author to remove any confusion.
  • Polish: Things to improve, I would change, I wish that …, I wonder if …, I couldn’t believe …

Support: Write a postcard

Complete a PMI chart Encouragestudents to use their PMI chart to highlight three elements (in three different colours or use coloured post-it notes) within the narrative that are positive, negative and interesting:

  1. Plus/Positive: Good/Positive experiences, themes, messages, events and happenings in the text.
  2. Minus/Negative: Events in the text that are negative/bad experiences in the text, things that go wrong etc.
  3. Interesting: Anything that appeals to the student; questions, feelings and emotions that arise, morals, messages and connections that resonate with the students.

Find out EN3-2A

Design a procedural text on how to make a catapult or ‘catty’ as described in the story, ‘Nobody’s Perfect’.

Research interesting facts about Botswana and present to the class as either of the story characters Nanvula or Kgosi.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

Expert Africa: Botswana Information

The Travelling Chilli: 13 Interesting Facts About Botswana

K’Shoo

poem by CJ Dennis | illustrated by Kerry Millard


Connecting to the text EN3-8D

Background reading: Strategy explained: text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world

  • Text-to-text connections occur when we make connections between other texts in relation to the text we are reading.
  • Text-to-self connections occur when we make connections between personal experiences and the text.
  • Text-to-world connections occur when we relate the text with what we already know about the world.

Text-to-Text: How do the ideas in this text remind you of another text (story, book, movie, song, etc.)? Complete the following statements:

  • What I just read reminds me of (story/book/movie/song) because …
  • The ideas in this text are similar to the ideas in …  because …
  • The ideas in this text are different than the ideas in … because …

Discuss as a class or use a worksheet from Think, Pair, Share.


Create EN3-7C

Decipher K’Shoo in small groups.

Create a short poem in the style of CJ Dennis’s ‘K’Shoo’.

Create a three-minute speech about CJ Dennis or other famous Australian poets.

Create a limerick.

Adapt ‘K’Shoo’ and other CJ Dennis poems into a podcast using Audacity. How to create a podcast.

Explore poetry: Read, write and perform poetry, multiple ideas here.

Write a bio poem using this Bio Poem Generator.

Explore poetic devices. Identify poetic devices in poems in each Touchdown issue of the year so far.

Choose an idea to celebrate poetry here.


Let’s find out EN3-8D

Google Slide Knowledge Chart to organise information about Poetry. What do you know about poetry? What would you like to know? What do you need to know?

Compare CJ Dennis to AB Patterson using a using this Venn diagram worksheet.

Write a biography of a famous Australian poet, using one of the biography worksheets.

Support: Simplified KWFL


Reflecting EN3-9E

I used to think ... But now I think … This routine helps students to reflect on their thinking about a topic or issue and explore how and why that thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs.


Further reading

English Textual Concepts

Resources

All Poetry: CJ Dennis

How to create a podcast

Resources for World Poetry Day (31 March)

Shel Silverstein Resources

Thinking Routines

Issue 4 - May, 2019


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